Skip to Content
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Log In
Streetsblog CA

Equity and Active Transportation Advocate Tamika Butler Resigns from California Transportation Commission

Tamika Butler, left, when she was sworn in as CTC commissioner. CTC Executive Director Susan Bransen and Commissioner Hilary Norton are with her. Image: Susan Bransen via Twitter

Equity organizations were surprised and delighted when Governor Newsom appointed outspoken advocate Tamika Butler to the California Transportation Commission last September. It looked like there might finally be a commissioner on board who understood and could articulate the challenges of people living in poor and underserved communities.

But Butler has resigned after a short tenure.

It's a huge disappointment to organizations and individuals who hoped that Butler's outspoken nature would provide a much-needed counterbalance to business as usual at commission meetings.

For years, various organizations had worked, without much success, to increase the diversity of representatives on the commission. It has been dominated by real estate and development interests, which has hampered progress towards slowing the expansion of highways, and California's transportation funding continues to accommodate driving while investments in other forms of transportation are not catching up. Advocates had hoped that Butler would help the commission focus on racial injustice, and bring the voices of those most affected by negative consequences of new transportation projects into the funding conversation.

Butler's resignation leaves three potential open spots on the commission for Governor Newsom to fill. Commissioners Lucy Dunn and Christine Kehoe have terms that expire soon. Tamika Butler's shoes would be very hard to fill, but hopefully Newsom will find people who can represent a wider range of concerns than those that have dominated the transportation funding conversation for the last fifty years.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog Los Angeles

Metro and Caltrans Expect to Complete Torrance 405 Freeway Widening Project Next Month

Metro and Caltrans are adding nearly two miles of new auxiliary freeway lanes, a new on-ramp, and widening adjacent streets including Crenshaw Boulevard and 182nd Street

July 19, 2024

Strategizing About Reduced Funding in the Active Transportation Program

Funding for Cycle 7 of the Active Transportation Program is less than $200 million, and already there have been requests for fifteen times the amount of available funding

July 18, 2024

Eyes on the Street: Hollywood Boulevard Bike Lanes are Open

The Hollywood bike lanes project, already very much in use, is also already being criticized by commenters at Nextdoor and other social media

July 17, 2024
See all posts