Skip to Content
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Log In
CicLAvia

CicLAvia Melrose Open Thread

CicLAvia hosts its 50th open streets event - on four miles of Melrose Avenue from East Hollywood to Fairfax

CicLAvia on Melrose. Photos by Joe Linton/Streetsblog

LongBeachize_Ad_Concepts
This article supported by Los Angeles Bicycle Attorney as part of a general sponsorship package. All opinions in the article are that of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of LABA. Click on the ad for more information.

Yesterday, the nonprofit CicLAvia hosted its fiftieth open streets event. CicLAvia Melrose opened four miles of Melrose Avenue between Fairfax and Vermont Avenues.

The first CicLAvia took place on 10-10-10 - October 10, 2010. That route also opened a small part of Melrose - at Heliotrope Drive. That Hel-Mel area, then informally known as the Bicycle District, was the home of the Bicycle Kitchen (which was soon thereafter gentrified out of Hel-Mel, then bought its own building in East Hollywood - but that's another story).

L.A. City Councilmember Katy Yaroslavsky welcomes riders (including her young kids) to CicLAvia Melrose

The fiftieth CicLAvia kicked off yesterday with remarks by L.A. City Councilmembers Katy Young Yaroslavsky and Hugo Soto-Martinez. Both councilmembers speeches were similar to their recent statements in support of the Healthy Streets L.A. initiative Measure HLA - proclaiming CicLAvia to be a place where Angelenos could experience a walkable, bikeable future.

As with nearly all Southern California open streets events, tens of thousands of people attended CicLAvia Melrose, mostly on bike, also plenty of runners, walkers, skaters, scooterists, people using wheelchairs, and more. Lots of folks were there from the 9 a.m. kick-off (and even earlier) and the route became crowded by early afternoon.

Melrose may feel like a big street most days, but Sunday it felt almost too narrow to contain huge crowds, especially at the three hubs along the route

One remarkable aspect is how these events transform streets. On most days Melrose feels like a noisy over-wide car-choked hostile place to bike or walk. During CicLAvia, especially at and near the hub by Paramount Studios, the street felt almost too small to contain the bustle of activity.

Below are additional photos from the event.

Afternoon crowds on Melrose at yesterday's CicLAvia
Skaters at CicLAvia Melrose
Certain types of human-powered slow-speed cars may be acceptable at CicLAvia
More than one kind of cycle at CicLAvia
Cyclists as far as the eye can see - from Melrose Hill during CicLAvia
Lots of pets took their human friends for walks at yesterday's CicLAvia
Cyclists of all ages passing in front of Paramount Pictures billboards on Melrose
CicLAvia cyclists in front of L.A.'s Ukrainian Culture Center in the former Jensens Melrose Theater building
CicLAvia Melrose

Readers - how was your experience at yesterday's CicLAvia Melrose event?

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog Los Angeles

Automated Enforcement Coming Soon to a Bus Lane Near You

Metro is already installing on-bus cameras. Soon comes testing, outreach, then warning tickets. Wilshire/5th/6th and La Brea will be the first bus routes in the bus lane enforcement program.

April 18, 2024

Metro Looks to Approve Torrance C Line Extension Alignment

Selecting the relatively low-cost hybrid alternative should help the oft-delayed South Bay C Line extension move a step closer to reality

April 16, 2024
See all posts