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Wiki Wednesday: Bike Box

4:12 PM PDT on July 30, 2008

bikebox_1web.gifThis StreetsWiki entry is rounding into encyclopedic form quite nicely. Andy Hamilton, DianaD (who also brought us the VMT entry last week) and Streetsblog's own Aaron Naparstek have been piecing together a detailed look at the history and effectiveness of bike boxes:

With nearly 40% of daily commuter trips taken by bike, Copenhagen,Denmark is generally considered the world's most bicycle-friendly city.Having been working with bike boxes for nearly 20 years, studies byDanish road engineers and transportation planners have found that bikeboxes significantly reduce the number of crashes between right-turningmotorists and bicyclists going straight through the intersection.The City of Copenhagen has concluded that bike boxes are most effectivewhen combined with a brightly colored lane continuing straight throughthe intersection to help alert right-turning motorists to the fact thatbicycle riders may be traveling straight through the intersection alongtheir right side[9].

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