Skip to Content
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Streetsblog Los Angeles home
Log In
Cash for Clunkers

Could Electric-Car Tax Credits Become the Next “Cash for Clunkers”?

10:51 AM PDT on August 14, 2009

The White House's commitment to electrified cars, fulfilling an Obama campaign promise to put 1 million plug-in hybrids into service by 2015, is bound to have serious ramifications for the nation's already-crumbling system of paying for transportation.

20090731_cash_for_clunkers_33.jpg(Photo: MPR)

But
could the administration continue to leave the gas tax untouched while
relying on taxpayer-subsidized rebates to gin up new car sales? That
prospect is a very real one, as two new posts from the Atlantic and the New Republic observe.

The
first post focuses on the government's plug-in hybrid tax credit, which
was expanded by the economic stimulus law to offer up to $7,500 per
vehicle for the first 200,000 models sold by every automaker.

The
Atlantic incorrectly states that the stimulus allocated $2 billion to
the credit -- that number is the estimated cost of the provision, which
has no dollar limit -- but the risk remains the same: If GM sells
200,000 of its Chevy Volts, the credit would take $1.5 billion in revenue from government coffers.

If similar successes for the Nissan Leaf
and the upcoming plug-in Toyota Prius follow, it's easy to see the cost
of the tax credit topping $4 billion. And as "cash for clunkers" showed,
members of Congress are loath to limit popular pro-industry programs
during an economic slowdown for fear of "messing with success" --
regardless of the estimated costs of the benefits in question.

That could lead to an extension of the plug-in hybrid credit to continue stimulating sales, at a continued cost to the already-depleted Treasury. Meanwhile, the less popular option of increasing the gas tax would immediately pay for itself (as my colleague Ryan put it earlier).

The New Republic's post looks at a still-unpassed proposal for "feebates,"
a combination of taxes on gas-chuggers and rebates for buyers who
choose cars that exceed fuel-efficiency standards. Again, feebates
follow the "cash for clunkers" template by using taxpayer money -- the
fees are not guaranteed to offset the rebates and likely wouldn't if
drivers flock to efficient models -- to encourage greener car-buying
behavior.

But even if an "independent mileage benchmark" were used to ensure that the feebates pay for themselves, as the author suggests,
the more prudent course of action would be simply to keep raising
fuel-efficiency (CAFE) standards. Given that a proposal for a 40 miles
per gallon standard fell three votes short of becoming law 20 years ago, the current 35.5-mpg plan appears ripe for an upgrade.

The
issue comes down to political courage: Offering rebates and tax credits
doesn't require much of it, but raising the gas tax and CAFE standards
takes quite a lot.

Stay in touch

Sign up for our free newsletter

More from Streetsblog Los Angeles

Friday Bikeways Update: Beach Bike Path Damage, 7th Street, and More

Updates on: beach bike path in Pacific Palisades, Michigan Greenway in Santa Monica, Parthenia Place in North Hills, 7th Street Streetscape in DTLA, and Imperial Highway near LAX

March 1, 2024

Measure HLA Fact Check: Sidewalk Costs

The city says $200 million worth of annual ADA work is "included in the cost" of Measure HLA, but the city is already on the hook for that ADA work anyway, so none of it should be included as HLA costs

March 1, 2024

Supervisor Hahn Calls for No Residential Demolitions in Metro’s 710 Freeway Corridor Project

"[For 710 Freeway expansion] Metro needs to commit itself to zero residential property takes. [Metro] should have as one its top priorities ensuring that our projects do not result in kicking people out of their homes."

February 29, 2024
See all posts