Wiki Wednesday: Bike Box

bikebox_1web.gifThis StreetsWiki entry is rounding into encyclopedic form quite nicely. Andy Hamilton, DianaD (who also brought us the VMT entry last week) and Streetsblog’s own Aaron Naparstek have been piecing together a detailed look at the history and effectiveness of bike boxes:

With nearly 40% of daily commuter trips taken by bike, Copenhagen,
Denmark is generally considered the world’s most bicycle-friendly city.
Having been working with bike boxes for nearly 20 years, studies by
Danish road engineers and transportation planners have found that bike
boxes significantly reduce the number of crashes between right-turning
motorists and bicyclists going straight through the intersection.
The City of Copenhagen has concluded that bike boxes are most effective
when combined with a brightly colored lane continuing straight through
the intersection to help alert right-turning motorists to the fact that
bicycle riders may be traveling straight through the intersection along
their right side[9].

You don’t have to be editor-in-chief of Streetsblog to contribute to StreetsWiki. Any member of the Livable Streets Network can jump in and edit an entry or add a new one.


At Strathmore and Westwood, It’s UCLA’s Bike Box

Bike Box! Drivers and cyclists riding east on Strathmore in Westwood have experienced something new the last several weeks. The Strathmore bike lane has been painted green and just before the intersection at Westwood, the lane extends in front of the mixed use travel lane creating Los Angeles’ first green painted bike box. A bike […]

America Could Have Been Building Protected Bike Lanes for the Last 40 Years

Salt Lake City is on track to implement the nation’s first “protected intersection” — a Dutch-inspired design to minimize conflicts between cyclists and drivers at crossings. For American cities, this treatment feels like the cutting edge, but a look back at the history of bike planning in the United States reveals that even here, this idea is far from new. In fact, […]