As Garcetti Speaks at NACTO, L.A. Mobility Advocates Protest Lack of Progress

Protestors form a people-protected bike lane outside the NACTO conference this morning. Photo by People Protected LA
Protestors form a people-protected bike lane outside the NACTO conference this morning. Photo by People Protected LA

The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) is hosting its Designing Cities 2018 conference in downtown L.A. this week. This morning, Los Angeles City Mayor Eric Garcetti addressed the gathering of transportation professionals.

Garcetti delivered brief opening remarks and then took interview questions from Chief Design Officer and former L.A. Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne.

Garcetti puts a good spin on what he calls L.A.’s “transportation renaissance.” The mayor pointed to successes in passing Measure M, the countywide transportation sales tax, and hosting the extraordinarily successful open streets event, CicLAvia. He billed Metro’s transit ridership decline as “less than other parts of the country.”

Garcetti touted “1,200 Vision Zero improvements,” though even the international press holds up L.A.’s largely-toothless Vision Zero efforts as an example of the United States’ failure to address its traffic violence. An Angeleno is killed in a traffic crash every 40 hours. Under Garcetti, this has gotten worse, though this is due to multiple factors, some of which are outside Garcetti’s control.

Christopher Hawthorne intverviewing Eric Garcetti at NACTO's Designing Cities conference this morning.
Christopher Hawthorne interviewed Mayor Eric Garcetti at NACTO’s Designing Cities conference this morning. Photo by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

The mayor seemed most excited when speaking on technology’s benefit to transportation. Garcetti said he wants to “make L.A. the transportation technology capital of the world” and expressed a hope that transportation tech would replace the “car city” image that people associate with Los Angeles. Garcetti described e-scooters as “just so damned fun” and touted their “great potential” for mobility and for helping build out bike infrastructure. He went on about high-tech VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) drone helicopters that could deliver people cheaply and safely to downtown helipads.

While Garcetti spoke, bicyclists lined up to form a people-protected bike lane on 7th Street in front of the InterContinental hotel, where the conference is being held. Using a tactic that seems to have originated in the Bay Area, people formed a human barrier between cars and the unprotected bike lane. Protestors held signs expressing frustration with the lack of Vision Zero progress and the slowed rate of bike facility implementation.

This morning's people-protected bike lane protest in front of the InterContinental hotel on 7th Street
This morning’s people-protected bike lane protest in front of the InterContinental hotel on 7th Street. Photo by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
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Protestors critiqued Mayor Garcetti’s lack of progress toward Vision Zero goals of ending traffic deaths. Photo by Sean Meredith

Protestors also hung a large banner citing increased traffic deaths under Vision Zero, and urging the city to go beyond lip service.

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Protest banner hung urging more than lip service to prevent traffic deaths. Photo by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

Garcetti gets criticism from both sides over his streets initiatives.

Since encountering an aggressively spite-filled and litigious backlash that resulted in the city undoing Playa Del Rey safety improvements, the city Transportation Department (LADOT) canceled several road diet projects planned under Vision Zero. Though this morning’s demonstration focused on Garcetti, many of our city councilmembers bear a great deal of responsibility for canceled safety measures. Garcetti does not appear to have used his considerable influence to help councilmembers to better embrace Vision Zero.

From his statements, it seems clear that Garcetti gets the importance of safer streets, but the on-the-ground situation tells another story. L.A. streets remain heavily car-centric and deadly, especially for vulnerable road users on foot and on bike.

  • Eric W

    About time to start calling all the LA City Council Members on the lack of meaningful progress with “Vision Zero”! There are so many bicycle death traps for cyclist in this city. Start fixing them with better design.

  • Dave

    As schoolchildren, almost all of us were subjected to group discipline to punish a few; perhaps it’s time to try this in the interest of Vision Zero–stop enforcing statutes against auto theft and vandalism until pedestrians and cyclists stop dying.

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