Eyes on the Street: BlueLA Electric Car-Share Opens at L.A. City College

BlueLA electric car-share vehicles at L.A. City College today. All photos: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
BlueLA electric car-share vehicles at L.A. City College today. All photos: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

Since BlueLA kicked off its electric car-sharing in Westlake in mid-2017, the company has been expanding operations. BlueLA offers point-to-point electric vehicle car-share. In L.A., the program is primarily designed to serve several low-income communities in central Los Angeles.

Today, BlueLA celebrated its newest car-share stations the launch of the public service at a kick-off event at Los Angeles City College. Speakers included L.A. City Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell, US Congressmember Jimmy Gomez, LADOT General Manager Seleta Reynolds, and others.

According to display maps at the event, BlueLA is currently available at 20 stations, with 20 additional stations coming later this year seven stations with 25 cars, to be expanded to 40 later this year. 

Map of BlueLA electric car-share stations
Map of BlueLA electric car-share stations

The BlueLA electric car-share program received a $1.7 million state cap-and-trade grant, augmented by $400,000 funded by the L.A. Department of Water and Power. BlueLA partners with several city departments, including LADOT, as well as a handful of non-profit community group partners. At full implementation, the program will include 100 all-electric vehicles located at 200 dedicated on-street spaces equipped with electric charging stations.

Representative Jimmy Gomez welcoming BlueLA car-share
Representative Jimmy Gomez welcoming BlueLA car-share
BlueLA car-share stations are located at the north end of the campus on Willow Brook Avenue, just west of Vermont Avenue, next to the southern entrance of the Metro Red Line Vermont/Santa Monica Station
BlueLA car-share stations are located at the north end of the campus on Willow Brook Avenue, just west of Vermont Avenue, next to the southern entrance of the Metro Red Line Vermont/Santa Monica Station
Cheerleaders celebrating the arrival of BlueLA electric car-share
Cheerleaders celebrating the arrival of BlueLA electric car-share

To sign-up for BlueLA car-share, go to the company website.

Article updated 4/23 per information from BlueLA.

  • I like this. It makes it that much easier to not own a car since you could just pick up a car when you need it. Plus, the cars are all electric and California’s electricity grid is about 25% renewable now, moving towards 50% by 2030. It’ll be interesting to see how this does financially and whether it can muster the resources to expand.

  • Who makes the cars?

  • Brad the Tortoise

    Agreed. As a member of a household that used to have two cars which is now carless, carshare services like this do a good job of filling the gaps left by public transit (larger shopping trips, travelling to trailheads for day hikes, etc.).

    I had a chance to talk to a Blue LA representative at Saturday’s Earth Day event and she told me that (unlike Maven and Zipcar) Blue LA doesn’t require users to drop off the car at the same station at which it was rented, a flexibility which will give them an edge once they’ve built out their network, IMHO, as it would allow me the opportunity to drive somewhere and take the Metro or some other travel method back home.

  • Courtney

    I would love to see this in Chicago!

  • LazyReader

    Bollore of France

  • LazyReader

    1st: So LA realizes it’s pointless to get people out of their cars So the politicians are present for a ribbon cutting ceremony for something they’ve been vehemently staunch opponents of, Poor people with cars on the road. Instead of subsidizing to the tune of tens of billions of your tax dollars towards rail transit few people ride (LA Metro only has 1.259 million daily riders, 650,000 to and from commuters afterall; that’s 6% of LA county population) A private company has sprung up essentially giving car utilization to poor people which grants far greater economic freedom to people with smaller incomes, because now they can go where ever they want. The car offers greater mobility and personal flexibility. A new report from the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies finds that the main cause of declining transit ridership in southern California is poor people buying cars. Between 1990 and 2000, when ridership was growing, the Los Angeles region grew by 1.8 million people but only 456,000 cars, or about one car per four people. Between 2000 and 2010, when ridership was shrinking, the region grew by 2.3 million people and gained 2.1 million cars, or nearly one car per new person.

    2nd Bus ridership has declined over 20% since the last decade alone. The cause, Metro had previously cut service in the early 1990s to pay for new rail lines it was building. In 1996, a local Bus Riders Union represented by the NAACP sued Metro, arguing that it was discriminating against non white bus riders in order to provide expensive trains to
    affluent neighborhoods. The lawsuit resulted in the court ordering Metro to restore bus service for ten years. Bus ridership rose 16% during that ten-year period. But as soon as it ended, Metro began cutting bus service and started an aggressive new rail construction program. The Gold Line which cost 2.8 Billion, the Expo line which cost 2.4 billion. The results are visible today. “Reimagining the routes,” as Metro proposes to do, is not likely to fix the problem. Instead, if it is serious about restoring ridership, Metro needs to stop wasting money on rail transit construction–something that is unlikely given that voters agreed November 2016 to give Metro more than $100 billion for new rail lines.

    3rd, the hypocrisy in the environment groups that support electric cars, loudly tout their benefits, Virtue signal people that don’t possess them. At the same time lead opposition for the extraction for the resources critical to their manufacture. Namely Copper, lithium and rare earth metals. The Sierra Club recently denounced Trump Admins permitting process for a road in Alaska, the Ambler Road, 220 mile road for allowing vehicles and equipment to mine for copper in Alaska……Typically vehicles range from compacts to SUV’s so they use between 18-50 pounds of copper in their manufacture for their wiring. A hybrid car on the other hand uses over 80-100 pounds copper, a Plug in hybrid uses about 130-150 pounds of copper and a Fully electric car uses between 180-250 POUNDS of copper; Over three or four times that of a normal car. Plus the charging infrastructure is also copper.

  • ATK87

    The entry of the US market for the Bluecar company was Indianapolis, we’re not far! Come check it out.

  • Thanks, I hadn’t seen them before.

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