Palos Verdes Estates Cyclists Stage Die-In Protest

Palos Verdes cyclists staged a die-in to urge the city of Palos Verdes Estates to take make streets safer
Palos Verdes cyclists staged a die-in to urge the city of Palos Verdes Estates to take make streets safer

Yesterday about 30 Palos Verdes bicyclists staged a peaceful protest against the inaction of the Palos Verdes Estates City Council. The event was organized by a group called Cyclists for Palos Verdes and Southern California Bike Safety. The cyclists are pushing for PVE to install five “Bikes May Use Full Lane” signs on Palos Verdes Drive West, a popular and scenic street used frequently by recreational cyclists.

In 2016, the Palos Verdes peninsula has experienced three cyclist deaths from motor vehicle crashes:

The Palos Verdes Estates City Council Traffic and Safety approved the new shared lane signage, but this approval was later overturned by the full city council. Protest organizers Delia Park and Kristie Fox expressed outrage over council allegations that signs were not needed because streets were “already safe” and because bike safety signage would “disrupt the peace and tranquility” of local neighborhoods, including the now-infamous Lunada Bay. Park and Fox see parallels in PVE antipathy toward “outsider” bicyclists and the Lunada Bay “Bay Boys” surfer gang activity excluding outsiders.

Cyclists die-in for safer streets. All photos: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
Cyclists die-in for safer streets. All photos: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
Cyclists staged the die-in to push Palos Verdes Estates to respond to recent cyclist deaths
Cyclists staged the die-in to push Palos Verdes Estates to respond to recent cyclist deaths
Uniformed police observed the cyclists die-in protest
Uniformed police and fire staff observed the cyclists die-in protest

The protest featured about thirty riders, wearing “blood-stained” shirts lying on the ground at the Malaga Cove Plaza’s grassy area at the corner of Palos Verdes Drive West and Via Corta. A few additional protesters held up signs to get their message across to passing automobile traffic. Eight uniformed PVE police officers and two county Firefighters observed

See additional coverage at Daily Breeze. To get involved contact Cycling in the South Bay.

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