And Now, for Something Completely Different

One of the great things about the passage of Measure R is that it inspired many people to dream about a Los Angeles that isn’t car-dependent.  Apparently, it’s inspired people outside of Los Angeles, and I mean well outside of Los Angeles, to dream a little dream as well.  Via Inhabitat:

The measure also inspired a competition to design new transport solutions, and Paris-based Odile Decq and Bonit Conrnette Architects
have proposed an extensive plan to make the ‘freeway city’ a little
greener. The project proposes large stretches of green space, a system
of small vehicles with designated transportation lanes and parking
stations, and a complete overhaul of the city’s streets, overpasses,
culverts, right of ways, power lines, and underutilized rail lines.

As much as I cringe at the mention of Los Angeles as a "Freeway City" and as sceptical as I am that anything resembling a PRT system would succeed in L.A.; the design above, and those after the jump, of a green design for the area around LAX are really something to behold.  Even if the hot air balloon is a little hokey; Los Angeles currently has lot of problems designing bus stops that are bicycle and pedestrian accessible and this plan has greenspace connecting the entire city to itself and even to our airports.

3_3_10_adbc_airport.jpg
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  • I love the concept of freeway cover parks, the price tag is always going to be a serious obstacle but they offer the best opportunity for reclaiming public space from unpleasant freeways. PRT? Not so much.

  • I also love the concept of freeways over parks. The idea of hot air balloons on the final approach to landing at LAX, as in the first photo, not so much.

  • DW

    Actually, StatsDude, those are parks over freeways. I wouldn’t be too big on a park under a freeway.

  • LOL. My dyslexia is really showing lately.

  • Marcotico

    Oh les wacky francais!

  • For more on Personal Rapid Transit in southern California (videos, links, studies): http://www.prtstrategies.com.

  • Spokker

    The PRT Strategies people are like spam bots now.

    You don’t have to post a link to your propaganda on every article that mentions PRT. If people think it’s cool they’ll go find out more about it.

  • Why not eliminate the freeways if you’re being so visionary?

  • Alek F

    My goodness…
    How many times can we repeat… again and again – PRT will not work!!
    We need a Mass transit system, not another “Personal” transit system that’s doomed for failure (except, the PRT will require even more investment…)
    We need Subway, LRT, better Bus service,
    but PRT?… gimme a break!
    P.S. I love the idea about the parks though. LA desperately needs park and green spaces, as well as improved Pedestrian environment – citywide.

  • Mike C

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