Caltrans Planning Three Complete Streets Projects in L.A. County

Pacific Coast Highway in Torrance - via Google Street View
Pacific Coast Highway in Torrance - via Google Street View
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At the August California Transportation Commission meeting, Caltrans shared some information about its planned Complete Streets program. Under the “Complete Streets Reservation,” Caltrans will add walk/transit/bike features on state highways. Lots of Caltrans’ state highways are freeways, but many of them are not; they include many local city streets.

As Streetsblog California reported, Caltrans has committed to “consider” complete streets elements in all its future projects. The current Complete Streets Reservation is a sort of an advance down payment on that commitment, while Caltrans updates its own guidelines and while projects make their way through the department’s multi-year planning processes. The complete streets program is part of Caltrans’ larger $17+ billion four-year State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP.)

Statewide, Caltrans is currently planning 31 complete streets projects, at an overall cost just under $100 million.

Streetsblog inquired to Caltrans District 7 for more details on their three complete streets projects in L.A. County. District 7 Public Information Officer Michael Comeaux provided the following project details and maps, though he cautioned that these projects are in the design phase, and subject to change.

Map of Caltrans Pacific Coast Highway improvements
Map of Caltrans planned Pacific Coast Highway complete streets improvements

State Route 1 – Pacific Coast Highway

The project is located on ~18 miles of Pacific Coast Highway from the Orange County line to Paseo De Las Delicias in Torrance – in the cities of Lomita, Long Beach, Los Angeles, and Torrance. Caltrans plans to add sidewalks (where they are missing), pedestrian beacons, and striping/markings. Estimated cost is $606,000.

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Map of Caltrans planned Alvarado Street and Santa Monica Boulevard complete streets improvements

State Route 2 – Alvarado Street and Santa Monica Boulevard

The project is divided into three separate segments – entirely in the city of Los Angeles:

  • Segment A: ~1.4 miles on Santa Monica Boulevard between Centinela Avenue (L.A./Santa Monica border) and Cotner Avenue (immediately east of the 405 Freeway) – in West Los Angeles
  • Segment B: ~2 miles on Santa Monica Boulevard between North Sycamore Avenue (immediately east of La Brea Avenue and the L.A./West Hollywood border) and Oxford Avenue (immediately west of the 101 Freeway) – in East Hollywood and Hollywood
  • Segment C: ~1.3 miles on Alvarado Street and Glendale Boulevard between the 101 Freeway and the 2 Freeway – in Echo Park

Caltrans plans to add a Bus Only/Bike Lane (apparently the northern portion of the partially opened Alvarado bus lane), pedestrian beacons, striping, markings, and a new signal. Estimated cost is $2,370,000.

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Map of Caltrans planned Western Avenue complete streets improvements

State Route 213 – Western Avenue

The project will be at various locations on the ~8-mile stretch of Western Avenue between 25th Street (San Pedro) and Carson Street (Torrance/L.A. Harbor Gateway) – in the cities of Lomita, Los Angeles, Rancho Palos Verdes, and Torrance. Caltrans plans to add sidewalks (where they are missing), Class 2 bike lane and Class 3 bike routes, and enhanced crosswalks. Estimated cost is  $1,529,000.

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