Reseda Boulevard Getting Its Great Street Improvements (Updated 5:30pm)

Reseda Boulevard now has parking-protected bike lanes! A Los Angeles first! Photo via @LADOTBikeProg Twitter
Reseda Boulevard now has parking-protected bike lanes! A Los Angeles first! Photo via @LADOTBikeProg Twitter

Update: LADOT Bicycle Program just tweeted photos of the Reseda Boulevard protected bike lanes! Woot! Wooooot! 

LA-Más crews spiffing up Reseda Boulevard sidewalks yesterday. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
LA-Más crews spiffing up Reseda Boulevard sidewalks yesterday. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

Great Streets improvements are underway on Reseda Boulevard in Northridge.

Streetsblog previewed Reseda Blvd’s exciting upgrades last week. It is just one of fifteen priority streets identified for makeovers under Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s Great Streets Initiative. The upgrades will extend one mile from Parthenia Street to Plummer Street. Kudos to Garcetti, Los Angeles City Councilmember Mitch Englander, and the city’s Transportation Department (LADOT) for taking advantage of street resurfacing and the upcoming State of the City address to pilot some innovative new street designs in Reseda.

The big big big exciting news is that Reseda Blvd will, very very very soon, have the city of Los Angeles’ very first parking-protected bike lanes.

I took the train-BRT-bike trip to Northridge yesterday, hoping to witness and tweet the tectonic shift of parking spaces from sidewalk-smooching to sidewalk-arm’s-length. Unfortunately the parking-protected bike lane has not been striped. Yet.

Reseda's regular bike lanes are missing after re-surfacing, as LADOT converts them into protected bike lanes. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
Reseda’s regular bike lanes are missing after re-surfacing, as LADOT converts them into protected bike lanes. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

I did notice that Reseda Boulevard’s striped median and inner travel lanes do appear a little narrower. So even if L.A.’s first mile of protected bike lanes is not there yet, it is clear that LADOT is making room for them.

This is your parents two-way turn median. Narrower median and turns preliminary striping on Reseda Boulevard. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.
This is not your parents two-way center turn median. Narrowed median and inner lanes preliminary striping on Reseda Boulevard. Photo: Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A.

Reseda Boulevard does have groovy new sidewalk patterns. 

Great Streets roped in LA-Más to give Reseda’s sidewalks a new look. Think People St plaza, but beyond just polka dots. LA-Más crews and volunteers were out painting a flagstone pattern on sidewalks on the east side of Reseda Blvd between Rayen Street and Gresham Street. I jumped in and got my hands dirty painting a bit, too.

Here’s what the finished product looks like:

New patterned sidewalks on Reseda Boulevard. Photo: LA-Más
New patterned sidewalks on Reseda Boulevard. Photo: LA-Más

In addition to the sidewalk pattern, LA-Más is adding new street furniture. Here is a preview of what it looks like:

LA Mas' new street furniture coming to Reseda Blvd soon. Photo: LA Mas
LA-Más’ new street furniture coming to Reseda Blvd soon. Photo: LA-Más

The entire project will be complete and ready for its close-up during Garcetti’s April 14 State of the City speech. Hopefully, the protected bike lanes will arrive this weekend.

If you are in the area, and you are happy to spot the new lanes, please let us know! Comment, tweet, post photos, dance, sing hymns of joy, etc.

  • I rode over there a couple days ago to see if they were done yet. I will probably ride over after work tomorrow just in case! Super exciting.

  • Looks good! Just make sure you get the conflict point design just right. Some of those details leave me slightly concerned but don’t look unfixable.

  • Tyson White

    First, what took so long, LA? If it can be done in NYC…

    Second, the “Smog Check” sign in the background of the painter is so apropos… Nice touch!

  • Tom

    This design is dangerous and stupid with no redeeming factors.When you park and get out of your car you have to do it in the traffic lane. Same if you want to get out of your car. You are automatically in danger of being hit by a car. By the way there are virtually no bikes on Reseda Blvd but the are lots of cars. There is no longer a neutral center lane. So there is no place for Fire engines, ambulances or the police to go. There are loss of parking spaces. So as you can see there is no benefit.

  • Nono_Yobiz

    Cool! Right turning trucks won’t be able to see bikes in the bike lane because they’ll be hidden behind cars! Kersplat! Send the footage to America’s Funniest Videos.

    Except it won’t be funny. Hiding crossing streams of traffic from each other is a terrible idea, and the PE who approved this should have his certification revoked.

  • Joe Linton

    Your prediction of doom hasn’t happened yet

  • D G Spencer Ludgate

    Now Now Now – Be objective.

    We will not have full year data (SWITRS) until August of 2017. Then we can compare 2014 to 2016 (2015 is a partial year).

    At that point we can compare Right Hooks, Left Crosses, and ROW (pull-outs). We can also see if cyclists get blamed for these if they are at fault via CVC 22350. Finally, we can see how many pedestrians get hit by cyclists and who gets blamed.

    Hopefully we will not be talking about cyclists who choose not to use the facility and have to fight CVC 21208 violations.

  • D G Spencer Ludgate

    The data is now in…

    Actually, Mr. “Guest” was correct.

    Comparing 2014 (last full year prior to installation) to 2016 (first full year after installation) on Reseda Blvd between Parthenia and Plumber:

    Neither year had bicycle fatalities.
    In 2014 there were three bicycle/motorist collisions. All three were due to cyclists riding against traffic.
    In 2016 there were three bicycle/motorist collisions. One right-hook, one left-cross, one pulling out of a driveway.

    Kersplat is correct!

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