Walkable Regions as a Economic Strategy

The purpose of the session is to introduce elected officials, city staff, and planners, to the economic value of walkable and bikeable communities. It will answer the questions:

How do the built environment and human activity impact economic, social and ecological value?
Why should cities and counties invest transportation and development dollars into bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure?
How do you engage the community, private developers, investors, funders, and businesses to create quality places for people?

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In Search of Places With “Good Bones”

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What do people mean when they say a city has “good bones”? Well, if the streets are laid out in a walkable grid pattern, that can be the “skeleton” for a healthy urban environment. The United States used to regularly build places with “good bones” up until around the 1920s, writes Robert Steuteville at Better […]

“Building Cities Shouldn’t Be a Partisan Issue”

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Over the weekend, we came across an article from the Isthmus of Madison, Wisconsin, reporting on a conservative scaremongering campaign against a commuter rail proposal. It quotes a leader in the Wisconsin Republican Party painting transit-oriented development as a red menace: "This has been done before," Dane County Republican Party spokesman Bill Richardson said on […]

Street Smart: Street Cars and Cities in the 21st Century

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oin the national nonprofit Reconnecting America and the Seaside Institute, the American Public Transportation Association, the national Community Streetcar Coalition, the City of Los Angeles, and other sponsors for:  A WORKSHOP ABOUT STREETCARS based on the award-winning book STREET SMART: STREETCARS AND CITIES IN THE 21st CENTURY THURSDAY, MAY 22, 2008, 8:00 a.m.-4 p.m. Orpheum […]