Walkable Regions as a Economic Strategy

The purpose of the session is to introduce elected officials, city staff, and planners, to the economic value of walkable and bikeable communities. It will answer the questions:

How do the built environment and human activity impact economic, social and ecological value?
Why should cities and counties invest transportation and development dollars into bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure?
How do you engage the community, private developers, investors, funders, and businesses to create quality places for people?

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

L.A.’s Urban Future: More Places Where I Want to Sit

|
I sometimes dream about a different Los Angeles; not the sprawling congested city, but an L.A. that is a series of walkable villages, like for example Santa Monica. They would be full of life and economic vitality, with corner stores, markets, coffee shops, plazas and parks. And they would all be connected by rail lines; streetcars that can whisk us away […]

Separate but Eco: Livable Communities for Whom?

|
Note: The authors are active advocates in the urban sustainability movement, focusing on non-motorized transportation in low-income urban areas. As mixed race women of color, we believe that we are in a unique position to bridge the advocacy communities trying to better conditions for the urban poor and for the environment. In this series, we […]

The Consequences of Doing Nothing

|
With the local campaign heating up in Santa Monica, so too is the rhetoric of competing visions for the future of the city. While Santa Monica is in the midst of some significant changes, there is one loose affiliation of local voices with a vision largely based on not building anything and trying to preserve in […]

Gentri-flyer Sets Off Social Media Storm in Boyle Heights

|
When I first saw the flyer at left pop up in my social media feeds yesterday morning, I actually thought it was a joke. Touting Boyle Heights as a “charming, historic, walkable, and bikeable neighborhood” where you could put down “as little as $40K with decent credit,” it invited Arts District neighbors to join in […]