DTLA Spring and Main Street Protected Bike Lane Project Event This Sunday

Visualization of new protected bike lanes planned for Spring and Main Streets in DTLA. Images via LADOT mainandspringfwd.com
Visualization of new protected bike lanes planned for Spring and Main Streets in DTLA. Images via LADOT mainandspringfwd.com

In early 2016, Los Angeles City Councilmember Jose Huizar announced that downtown L.A.’s Spring and Main Street buffered bike lanes couplet will be getting an upgrade to protected bike lanes. The complete streets improvements are part of they city’s DTLA Forward initiative, so the project is now called “Main & Spring Forward.”

Today, Huizar announced the next step for the project: a new visualization tool, called Pocket Owl. Huizar and the city Transportation Department (LADOT) will be hosting a kick-off event for the Main & Spring Forward Pocket Owl this Sunday March 5 at noon at the corner of Spring and 6th Street.

Rendering of protected bike lane planned for Spring Street in downtown L.A.
Rendering of protected bike lane planned for Spring Street in downtown L.A.
If readers cannot attend the kick off (perhaps due to participating in the nation’s hugest and likely most wonderfulest open streets event ever ever ever – yes: 626 Golden Streets), then check out the renderings online. There will be community meetings for Main & Spring Forward taking place on March 23 and 26, with the project’s initial phase expected to be complete this fall.
  • AJ

    Queue up filming backlash in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1…

  • chairs missing

    Huizar is the man!

  • Dennis_Hindman

    The LADOT could afford to install this quality of protected bike lanes on 2 streets per fiscal year using up to $4.2 million in funds from the local return of Measure R funds.

  • James

    Are there going to be any provisions such as a turn pocket for two stage left and right hand turns or will this resemble Long Beach’s protected lanes in that cyclists will leave the bike lanes, cross over full traffic lanes and make a vehicular turn or use the crosswalk (and block pedestrian traffic) to do a two stage turn? The intersections depicted are examples of easier to engineer intersections where the only turn possible is from the protected bike lane. I’d like to see the designs for intersections in which the intersecting streets are one way in the other direction or two way.

  • BruceWillisThrowsACar@You

    NYC has it’s own fking problems like piece meal infrastructure, NIMBY shtbags, and cops that ticket other cyclists when a cyclist dies.