Without a Car in the World Public Program 3: Walking in LA with DJ Waldie – Tonight!

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Despite being amongst the first to offer a preview of World Without a Car, the amazing car-free photography exhibit by Diane Meyer in Santa Monica, I’ve somewhat fallen down on the job of promoting the events that go with the exhibition.  Well, I can correct that at least for one day.  Below is an email from Meyer touting tonight’s panel discussion:

Cees
Nooteboom once wrote of LA, “In a city with streets longer than fifty
kilometers, the measure of one foot is absurd, and so is the use of
one’s feet as a means of transportation.” Taking it’s name from the
Missing Person’s song which claims that ‘Nobody Walks in LA,’ this
panel discussion will explore the social, spatial, and psychological
aspects of walking in Los Angeles.

With:

Anastasia Loukaitou-Sideris, Professor and Department Chair, UCLA Department of Urban Planning

Herbert Medina, Professor, Department of Mathematics, Loyola Marymount University

Nigel Raab, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Loyola Marymount University,

DJ Waldie, author Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir and Where we Are Now: Notes from Los Angeles, Public Information Office, City of Lakewood

Damon Willick, Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, Loyola Marymount University

Where:

18th Street Arts Center, 1639 18th Street, Santa Monica

When:

Wednesday, November 11, 7pm

For more info: 

www.18thstreet.org


  • I am entering my 10th year Downtown with no car and while it has limited me in some of things I used to do – my living and working in a walkable area and not being dependent upon public transportation is the only way it can work for me.

    And that needs to be the future of development in LA. Highly dense, walkable centers – connected by rail to other dense walkable areas. But one has to also realize and accept that the much of the rest of the city will still be largely dependent upon the car and that further increasing density in those areas will never make them dense enough for rail but will make too crowded for cars and buses to properly service those neighborhoods.

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