California Legislation Watch: Weekly Update

For social media coverage of California’s statewide transportation issues, follow Melanie @currymel on Twitter or like the Streetsblog California Facebook page.

Here’s Streetsblog’s weekly highlight of legislation and events related to sustainable transportation at the California capitol.

  • News on the implementation of S.B. 743, which removes Automobile Level of Service (LOS) from consideration as an environmental impact in areas with robust transit. The state’s Office of Planning and Research released the public comments it has received on its update of CEQA guidelines and its draft guidelines for S.B. 743, passed last year. S.B. 743 requires the OPR to come up with a new urban planning metric to replace LOS that measures the effect of development and transportation projects on all traffic, not just car drivers. Proponents are enthusiastic about eliminating an outdated, car-centric measure that has led to wider, faster streets. Critics worry that cities and counties no longer have the means to require developers to improve streets. The next steps: drafting the actual guidelines, releasing them for public comment in late spring, and producing a final draft version of the guidelines by July 1.
  • Caltrans published a new mission statement: “Provide a safe, sustainable, integrated and efficient transportation system to enhance California’s economy and livability.” This is a vast improvement over the old one, “Caltrans improves mobility across California,” and it contains all the right buzzwords. The mission statement was the first item on the Early Action Plan outlined in the State Smart Transportation Initiative report urging deep reforms in Caltrans. Check — now to work.
  • More extensive senate hearings saw debates about the governor’s cap-and-trade expenditure plan and high-speed rail, this time in the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee and the Senate Budget Subcommittee on Resources, Environmental Protection, Energy and Transportation. CA High-Speed Rail Authority CEO Jeff Morales defended the use of cap-and-trade funds for high speed rail, and Senator Jim Patterson (R-Fresno) attacked cap-and-trade as a slush fund and high-speed rail as an expensive project that will produce a “puny” reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Plenty of comments from the Legislative Analyst’s Office and various interest groups.

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California Legislation Watch: Weekly Update

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For social media coverage focused on statewide issues, follow Melanie @currymel on Twitter or like our Facebook page here. Here’s Streetsblog’s weekly highlight of legislation and events related to sustainable transportation at the California capitol. The big news out of Sacramento is that Caltrans endorsed the NACTO Urban Street Design Guidelines. S.B. 1183, Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord): […]

California Legislation Watch: Weekly Update

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Here is Streetsblog’s weekly highlight of California legislation related to sustainable transportation. The legislature just came back from its August recess and spent the week catching up on its to-do list. The next few weeks will see a flurry of bills being voted on—and amended—before the session deadline on August 31. LOS gone from CEQA: Big […]

California Legislation Watch: Weekly Update

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Here is Streetsblog’s weekly highlight of California legislation and events related to sustainable transportation. This week, many of the bills that Streetsblog has been tracking are waiting for the budget committees to work through them, so there hasn’t been a lot of action. Traffic violations in school zones: S.B. 1151, Anthony Canella (R-Ceres), sailed through […]