Two New Bike Corrals Installed on Abbot Kinney Blvd.

The new corral in front of Gjelina Takeaway on Abbot Kinney.
The new corral in front of Gjelina Take Away on Abbot Kinney.

Fabled Abbot Kinney Boulevard, on Los Angeles’ Westside, is the first street in the city to have two bike corrals installed. Councilmember Mike Bonin alerted Streetsblog to their installation this morning and I was able to bike over and catch one of the installations as it was being finished and another corral in action.

1205
The new street front for Local 1205.

These are the third and fourth corrals in the entire city. Bike corrals are dedicated bicycle parking areas created with the removal of one or two parking spaces. As shown above, a city can create safe and attractive parking for twelve bicycles in the space that used to park one car.

If you’re interested in seeing some bike corrals added to your neighborhood, the People St program at LADOT is accepting applications through April 30, with a second project submission period coming up in October. While People St will be working with community-based organizations for future corrals, parklets and plazas, these two corrals were already in the project pipeline.

The first corral is in front of Gjelina Take Away (1427 Abbot Kinney). When I arrived the corral was partly in-use with a handful of bicycles already tethered in the twelve bike parking spaces. Of course, the three bicycles are an improvement over the one car that would have fit into the same space last night. As I shot the pictures, a happy cyclist was handed a sandwich in a bag, hopped on his bike and was on his way.

Bike corrals: good for bikes, good for business.

Two blocks up the street, LADOT staff was putting the finishing touches on another corral at 1205 Abbot Kinney Blvd. in front of Local 1205, another local restaurant. Amusingly, you can still see the car parking restriction signs that remind us of the inefficient use of space that preceded the corral’s installation.

“One of the coolest streets in LA just got a lot cooler thanks to two new bike corrals that will let dozens of people safely park their bikes as they visit businesses in the area,” said Councilmember Bonin. “Bike corrals are a great use of space and an excellent reminder that our streets belong to everyone – including those who travel on two wheels.”

The design of the Abbot Kinney corrals is identical to the Atwater Village corral installed last fall. Four other corrals are planned in addition to the ones that will be built later this year as part of People St.

LADOT covered the entire cost of purchasing hardware for the corrals, as well as design and installation.  The only cost to the property owner is the cost of maintaining the corral, including checking for vandalism and graffiti.

 

  • Austin Brown

    Next they need to resurface the street so my teeth stop chattering when I ride down it.

    After that, they need to figure out how to close the street for First Fridays, because frankly it’s a joke shoving that many people onto a sidewalk that’s 2 feet wide in parts.

  • rickrise

    Very good news, though I don’t favor that literally corral-like design…in using the one on Glendale Blvd, I noted that it’s very difficult to lock two bikes to one element. In fact I challenged a City Planning staffer to lock up next to my bike, and he gave up trying after five minutes of struggle.

    Good on LA to be catching up to its surrounding cities! Santa Monica’s section of main Street a few blocks away boasts three (well, two and a half) very easy to use bike corrals, which are often packed. These corrals on Abbot Kinney should get even more use, as the sidewalk racks on that street are very often entirely parked up.

  • Why the ridiculous signage embedded in the pavement?

  • ubrayj02

    I really do not like these bike prisons. A row of simple inverted U’s works so much better for irregular bikes. How the hell am I going to get my bakfiets into this stupid cage and out again? The design to copy from other cities is dead simple and effective. Are we getting something special by coming up with an engineer-designed steel holding pen for bikes that makes them worry their papers aren’t in order and they’re being deported? This Homeland Security bike jail design needs to go!

  • ubrayj02

    Santa Monica’s got killer bike parking corrals compared to this turd. No more bike jails already, dudes.

  • Guest

    Dear LADOT,
    Thank you for your efforts, but please stop installing these poorly considered bike corrals which:
    1. Do not provide quick and easy access
    2. Forces people to clumsily back their bikes in in order to attempt to lock within the rear triangle
    3. Limits the ability to lock multiple bikes efficiently
    4. Requires a kick-stand to stabilize a bike while locking because city streets slope toward the curb

    The Cafe de Leche bike corral is far superior to this design.

  • michael macdonald

    Dear LADOT,
    Thank you for your efforts, but please stop installing these poorly considered bike corrals which:
    1. Do not provide quick and easy access
    2. Force people to clumsily back their bikes in in order to attempt to lock within the rear triangle
    3. Limit the ability to lock multiple bikes efficiently
    4. Require a kick-stand to stabilize a bike while locking because city streets slope toward the curb

    The Cafe de Leche bike corral is far superior to this design.

  • Joe B

    If only some respected organization would compile a document explaining how to properly do bike parking.

    Oh wait, they did! http://www.apbp.org/?page=publications

  • madelinebrozen

    I agree there is a much better design solution than what’s been installed here. I believe the SF example does a much better job. The main advantage for users is that they can enter and exit from the street. Additionally, it’s more intuitive than this design because the racks are what people are used to. Lastly, it’s probably cheaper but I can’t confirm that.

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