Asm. Gatto: Don’t Turn Hyperion Bridge Into Highway

As reported on Tuesday, Assemblyman Mike Gatto is now the first elected official to publicly oppose the currently proposed redesign of the Hyperion Viaduct over the Los Angeles River. Critics of the redesign argue that the proposed widening the lanes and adding crash buffers will only encourage more unsafe driving both on the bridge and through the connecting communities.

Asm. Gatto

Gatto agrees. In a letter written to the Department of Environmental Planning, which is overseeing the environmental review of the $50 million project, Gatto writes:

I am concerned that the current project proposal would create something freeway-like, in an area where such a structure is not needed, wanted, or safe. A freeway-like bridge would also encourage unsafe automobile speeds and would fail to create a multi-modal transit route, which locals want and deserve.

Written comments are due by October 11, but a public hearing has been promised (but not scheduled.) For more on how to comment, and a draft letter, visit the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition’s action alert.

A full copy of Gatto’s letter can be found after the jump.

10.09.2013 Hyperion Bridge Bike Lane Support Letter

  • Norm

    Assemblyman Gatto should work to get the ludicrous state law that requires raising speed limits on streets where there are a lot of scofflaws REPEALED or this effort will be fruitless.

  • Donezo

    Norm,

    Kudos for you for even knowing about that state law. Gatto I think ALREADY did a lot on that. Pulled off a miracle in 2011 with AB 529.

  • Anonymous

    One thing missing: needs to mention removal of sidewalk! Pedestrians getting shunted off yet another bridge is not good for this city’s future. Such a beautiful bridge and it will be more inhospitable to walking than ever if this retrofit goes through.

  • brianmojo

    I didn’t realize this, but he totally did:

    http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/bill/asm/ab_0501-0550/ab_529_cfa_20110609_124112_sen_comm.html

    That said, I still wonder if there’s not a way that an authority could set a speed limit that they deem prudent rather than whatever people are driving. People just drive 5mph over whatever’s posted.

  • When he was an Assemblyman Paul Krekorian tried his best to get that law changed, but it was beaten back by the Film and Television Industry…NO I’M ONLY KIDDING, it was killed by AAA and the California Highway Patrol who gave “expert testimony” that it would lead to speed traps being set up around the state.

  • Don Ward

    THANK YOU Assemblyman Gatto!! Your leadership on this, the hit and run issue and the speed trap law is what the live-able streets movement needs so badly.

  • Kenny Easwaran

    My reading of that suggests that the bill bans lowering speed limits in ways that used to be legal. It used to be that they could round down from the 85th percentile, and then for safety reasons go 5 mph lower, but the point of the bill being discussed here was to say that rounding down already uses up the 5 mph lowering. But maybe I’m misinterpreting what it says.

  • Kenny Easwaran

    I’m glad that he seems to be doing the right thing here. But my first exposure to him as a lawmaker was when he sponsored the bill to get rid of carpool lanes outside of rush hour.

  • allisonbike

    Go mike gatto, i.like how explicit he is in saying no to old school l.a. Planning!

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

The Looming Disaster of the Hyperion-Glendale Bridges Re-Design

|
Earlier this week, Streetsblog published an article about how the Hyperion-Glendale Complex of Bridges Rehabilitation Project was giving short shrift to bicyclists and pedestrians and everyone that lived in the area. At the time, based on information provided to us by the Bureau of Engineering, I assumed that the issue could be resolved by arguing […]

The Hyperion Bridge Uprising Storms the Gates

|
I’m going to make a little confession. When I first wrote about the Glendale Boulevard-Hyperion Avenue Complex of Bridges redesign project, I was resigned to a negative outcome. I believed the Bureau of Engineering was too far along in the process, and city leaders too entrenched in the outcome. At the time, the city noted […]