Bike Parking Ordinance Moves Back to City Council

(Update, January 17: The City Council passed the ordinance without any discussion at yesterday’s full meeting. It now awaits the Mayor’s signature to become law. – DN)

It’s been over 15 months since it seemed the city was poised to enact a progressive bike parking ordinance that would dramatically increase the amount of bicycle parking required in new developments. In that time, the ordinance was sent back to City Planning for a handful of technical corrections, before it re-appeared in front of the City Council Planning and Land Use Committee hearing earlier today.

Ed Reyes and the rest of the City Council are still waiting for their chance to pass the city's bike parking ordinance. Photo: LADOT Bike Blog

With Committee Chair Ed Reyes not in attendance, acting chair Jose Huizar put the motion on the consent calendar. THe ordinance could be voted on by the full City Council as early as later this month. The transportation committee already waived consideration of the ordinance after holding hearings last year. The Council also passed a “negative declaration” last year, meaning the city found that increasing bike parking would have no negative impact on the city’s air quality.

“This is a huge milestone in further establishing cycling as a legitimate mode of transportation in this City,” writes Bill Rosendahl, Chair of the City Council Transportation Committee.

“If you were to travel by car and knew at the end of the trip there was a high probability that your car would be vandalized or stolen you would think twice about making that trip.  The same rule applies to those who travel by bicycle.  And just as we have automobile parking standards for private development, we will now have bicycle parking standards for private development.  It’s about equity and encouragement.  You simply can’t expect people to travel by bicycle unless you provide safe, secure and available bicycle parking at the end of the trip.”

The ordinance, once approved by the full Council and signed by the Mayor, includes a swap of car parking for bicycle parking at commercial and residential developments.  Up to 30% of auto parking can swapped for bicycle parking within a commercial nonresidential  project and 15% of auto parking can be swapped within a residential project that is near a major bus or transit station.  This could be particularly crucial for the transit oriented developments that pop up as a result of the new train lines that are coming online as a result of Measure R.

The ordinance also provides a mechanism to add more bike corrals to city streets.   These on-street public bicycle parking spaces offer an opportunity to provide ample bicycle parking without taking up pedestrian space on sidewalks. Bike corrals have been proven to increase bicycle usage in areas where they are installed, as they encourage residents to travel by bicycle around their neighborhoods to do their shopping and errands.  The corral at Cafe De Leche in Northeast L.A. was part of a pilot program that was succesful enough that the LADOT and City Planning are comfortable enough to let them flourish city-wide.

 

1 thought on Bike Parking Ordinance Moves Back to City Council

  1. There are an estimated 17,000 bicycle commuters on a given weekday in Los Angeles, according to the 2011 American Community Survey results done by the Census Bureau, and yet the city has only installed 4,000 inverted U bicycle racks that are designed to hold up to two bicycles apiece.

    New York City has installed 14,500 bicycle racks for a population about twice that of LA. and has  a bicycle commuting modal share that is 4/5th of LA.

    The city of Chicago has put in 10,042 bike racks and yet is about 5/7th the size, with a commuting bicycle modal share 40% larger than LA.

    Tokyo has a population of 12.5 million people and only 45 miles of bike lanes and paths. Yet, they have 40 times more bicycle parking spaces than New York City and a 16.5%bicycling modal share.

    San Francisco is the first city in the U.S. to count their public parking spaces for vehicles and they found out that there are 441,541 public parking spaces for about an equal amount of registered vehicles. The city has a population of 812,826.

    Los Angeles needs a significant increase in public bicycle parking to meet the demand.

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