Life Without Measure R: Massive Transit Cuts in Orange County

Earlier today the Orange County Transit Authority’s Board of Directors voted, by a 14-1 margin, to cut 150,000 hours of transit service by early next year.  Believe it or not, the plan was actually an improvement from an earlier draft of the cuts had 300,000 hours of service.  The Register describes the cuts:

Eliminated routes include service from Seal Beach to Westminster and
Brea to Santa Ana on weekdays. Service from Huntington Beach to Costa
Mesa will be eliminated on weekends.

Midday service from Fullerton to Huntington Beach will be eliminated
on weekdays. The plan eliminates about 8 percent of the county’s bus
service by early next year. Eight routes will be restructured and the
frequency of service would be reduced on 11 routes on the weekdays.

While transit advocates, such as the outstanding writers at Transit Rider O.C., have focused their advocacy efforts at the Board of Directors; the fiscal mess at the state level and the Governor’s illegal desire to raid transit funds to alleviate said mess made today’s vote a decision on where to make cuts not if to make cuts.  That’s not to say the OCTA, a group that has never met a road-widening project that it didn’t love is blameless; it’s just that decisions made to basically liquidate the voter-approved state operating assistance fund have left transit agencies in the lurch statewide.  Locally, Measure R may forestall local cuts, but that’s not to say that they won’t be coming sooner, rather than later.

As is normally the case, the biggest victims of the cuts are students, people of lesser means, the transit dependent and late night workers.  With today’s cuts totaling 8% of OCTA’s total service hours.  To their credit, advocates and just regular riders packed the Board Room today to speak their piece about the cuts.  While their pleas didn’t change the outcome, hopefully these same people will remember today when it comes time to vote on their state leadership next year.

  • Spokker

    Many people complain when billions are spent in East LA and South LA on light rail, but what’s going down in Orange County is truly the creation of an unequal transportation network.

  • Hi, I’m from the OCTA and I’ve got a correction for your article.

    In the last paragraph, when you say “As is normally the case, the biggest victims of the cuts are students, people of lesser means, the transit dependent and late night workers.”

    We think it is more accurate to say “As is normally the case, communists, slackers, illegals, mud people, cry babies, and Obama fans will be faced with their childish dreams of getting around without a car (also they are losers)”.

    Thanks for making this vital correction.

    Sincerely,

    Orange County’s Troubled Assets

  • LAofAnaheim

    This is the one time the Bus Riders Union should get involved. If they call the MTA racists…what should OCTA be called? That’s transit injustice to the max. It’s one thing if both the widenings and transit cuts happened simultaneously..but another when widenings are still happening and transit gets cut.

  • I sort of relish Orange County doing this to its citizens in a very dark way. What was that place good for prior to the colonization of California by the defense industry?

    LA up, OC down!

  • Spokker

    Anaheim was once considered a model city by the KKK, according to people I’ve talked to. Now it’s majority Hispanic. Hooray!

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