Place It! w/James Rojas in Downtown Los Angeles

 Let your imaginations run wild, while problem-solving, planning, designing, cooperating, and collaborating to build a 3-D interactive map/model of a city of your dreams in this critically-acclaimed workshop with MIT-graduate and city planner James Rojas!
Rojas will discuss key elements of the logistics, creativity, empathy and design used in shaping how we live using colorful found objects in order to build a city which provides a harmonious and efficient space for its citizens. The workshop will then let you put these concepts into action, giving attendees the opportunity to use their own creative interpretation of an “empire” of urban awesomeness: placing residential and commercial buildings, open spaces, street-mapping, and utilities into a sustainable mosaic.   Workshop denizens will then break into groups to show-and-tell their cities, followed by a session where various cities are made by a larger group synthesis, and culminating in group presentations on their designed cities.
This event is for ages 18 and under, with participants under 13 needing to be accompanied by an adult.   Adults: DON’T WORRY! You can participate, too! We’ll assign you separate tables so you can come up with your versions and present them. The dialogue from different perspectives will make for delicious brain food.
James Rojas: Conceived by urban planner and SA+P alumnus James Rojas (MCP, SMArchS ’91), this interactive exercise breaks down planning barriers by using a 3- dimensional map to help people visualize and think through the planning process. Playing and visualizing with the 3-dimensional forms engages participants of all ages as well as creates a platform for diverse voices. The installation constantly changes as previous work builds upon the contributions of others. Rojas has taken these workshops across the world and in variations large (500 people) and small (10 people) to universities, corporations, individuals, nonprofits and more. FOr more, view the gallery: http://www.placeit.org/gallery.html

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