Welcome to the Blogroll: More Than Red Cars

The new year heralded a new blog devoted to "The Obscure, Offbeat
and Half-Forgotten Transportation History of Southern California",
Charles Hobbs’s More Than Red Cars.

I’ve known Hobbs since 1994, when I first became involved with
Southern California Transit Advocates. At the time he was Vice
President and also editor of the monthly newsletter The Transit
Advocate (of which he is the founder). In that way that things
sometimes go full circle after undertaking various roles over the years
he is currently again serving as Vice President.

In his first post Hobbs’ revealed the name of the blog is also the
working title to a book he is writing, which will provide fodder for
the blog. His plans are to post short histories of bus and rail lines
in Southern California, transit trip reports, and short articles about
libraries and archives. This thus far has ranged to include histories
of a one time auto repair training school empire and of transit service
along Whitter Blvd.

I’m curious what obscure corner of local transportation history
Hobbs will explore next. And it is impressive the range and depth of
what he has posted thus far.: Moe:

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