Obama Quietly Gets Federal Agencies Involved in Transport Planning

When President Obama signed an executive order in October requiring federal agencies to craft strategies for reducing their greenhouse gas emissions, he described the mandate as Washington "lead[ing] by example" on the pollution-reduction front.

Obama_bike.jpg(Photo: AP)

And
that’s true — but the order also includes language telling federal
agencies to get involved in integrating local transportation planning,
with a particular focus on selecting sites for government facilities

that are pedestrian-friendly, near existing employment centers, and
accessible to public transit, and emphasize existing central cities
and, in rural communities, existing or planned town centers;

The
overall goal for government agencies, as Obama’s order put it, should
be to "strengthen the vitality and livability of the communities in
which federal facilities are located." Given that more than 2,200
communities host federally owned or leased property, that edict could unleash a lot of local energy for transit and pedestrian improvements.

The
order also gives federal agencies eight months to craft long-term
sustainability plans focusing on how to implement "strategies and
accommodations for transit, travel, training, and conferencing that
actively support lower-carbon commuting and travel by agency staff."
The White House budget office and Council on Environmental Quality are
charged with vetting each agency’s proposal.

And as each agency devises those emissions-cutting plans, the Obama administration’s push to consider sustainability as a transportation, housing, and environmental issue is given a meaty role in the process.

The
order asks U.S. DOT, in collaboration with the Department of Housing
and Urban Development and the Environmental Protection Agency, to
suggest ideal strategies to the White House for locating new federal
facilities. According to the order:

The
recommendations shall be consistent with principles of sustainable
development including prioritizing central business district and rural
town center locations, prioritizing sites well served by transit,
including site design elements that ensure safe and convenient
pedestrian access, consideration of transit access and proximity to
housing affordable to a wide range of Federal employees, adaptive reuse
or renovation of buildings, avoidance of development of sensitive land
resources, and evaluation of parking management strategies.

It’s likely to take some time before the order begins to have a
palpable effect on the vast federal bureaucracy’s approach to land use
— epitomized by a dispute over employee parking at one federal building that has effectively stalled the nomination of a new General Services Administrator.

But
the White House’s early effort at getting federal, state, and local
players to consult one another on development appears to be aiming in
the right place.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

STREETSBLOG USA

Feds Begin Redefining ‘Affordable Housing’ to Include Transport Costs

|
Comparing the transportation savings in dense versus dispersed neighborhoods for a dozen U.S. metro areas. (Chart: CNT) The process of expanding the federal government’s definition of "affordable housing," a stated goal of the Obama administration’s sustainable communities effort, began in earnest yesterday with the introduction of a new index that integrates transportation prices into the […]
STREETSBLOG USA

Answers to Your Top 6 Questions About Obama’s New Infrastructure Initiative

|
Last week, President Obama announced that amid Congressional dysfunction around transportation funding, he was taking action to foster infrastructure investment and economic growth. The Build America Investment Initiative will provide technical assistance to communities looking for guidance on how to leverage private dollars to build public works. But the initiative doesn’t actually provide any dollars itself. Here’s the […]

The Legacy of S.B. 375: Transforming Planning to Transform California

|
Climate Plan, a coalition of more than fifty nonprofits working on California climate policies, released a report [PDF] about what we’ve learned from S.B. 375, one of California’s policy efforts to grapple with climate change. The coalition held a day of presentations in Sacramento on Monday to celebrate the release. Presenters—people who’ve been working in […]

Here’s Your Chance to Support Complete Streets in State Planning Guidelines

|
Not a Complete Street. Photo: Matthias Kaeding/Flickr The California Transportation Commission (CTC), is the state body charged with creating guidelines for agencies such as the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and other regional planning bodies. This year, the CTC’s guidelines are of greater interest to Livable Streets advocates because the language contains language that […]