Eyes on the Street: Transit Adjacent Development

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When people around the country discuss "transit oriented development" they describe tall buildings surrounding a bus or train station that are designed to discourage car commuting.  In its definition of T.O.D., Streetswiki even states:

A TOD also usually has relatively easy access for people on foot and
bikes, while cars and other vehicles are discouraged from parking too
close to the station. As a result, TODs are often friendlier to
pedestrians and bicyclists than other forms of land development, and
they encourage people to ride trains and buses rather than drive.

Given that, why does Noho Commons, a "transit oriented development" located across the street from the Orange and Red Line stop in North Hollywood, entice drivers to a boast of free parking?

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