Wiki Wednesday: Farmer’s Markets

2757558897_f3b24e994c.jpgSouth Bronx Greenmarket. Photo: Susan Donovan

Streetsblogger rex
commented earlier today that we may be headed for what he termed a
"Grapes of Wrath kind of economy" — one in which businesses prosper by
paring down inventories to bare essentials while doing what they can to
make themselves more accessible to the car-free masses.

Another key element to such an economy could be locally-grown
food, available at farmers’ markets — the subject of this week’s
featured StreetsWiki article. In this entry, Streetsblog regular Susan Donovan writes:

By reducing the distance that food travels, fewer fossil fuels are used
and fewer greenhouse gases are released. On average, an American meal
travels 1,500 miles to reach the dinner table. Farmers’ markets also
avoid some of the costly packaging found in some stores. Many farmers’
markets are accessible by foot or bicycle, providing another way to
reduce your carbon footprint.

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(Mark Vallianatos is Policy Director of UEPI and an Adjunct Professor at Occidental College, where he currently teaches the Environmental Stewards class. Mark is co-author of The Next Los Angeles: the Struggle for a Livable City and a number of publications on food access, transportation, and goods movement.) Several years ago, our institute collaborated with […]