You’ll Wonder Why You Ever Drove a Car

cicle_mock_ad_moonroof_resizr.jpg

Are you tired of those flashy car commercials that promote the "amenities" of cars. You know the ones, they’ll promote a sunroof as bringing the driver closer to nature and somehow manage to avoid the corrosive effect car culture has on our world?

Well, via our friends at C.I.C.L.E. comes an ad campaign, designed by former angeleno Katie Faust, that turn these ads on their head. By using flashy pictures and a slick poster design, Fausts’ posters resemble an ad for a German sports car except for the bike in the place usually reserved for a Porsche or BMW. In addition to the slick design, the posters’ text reads like copy I’m bombarded with everytime I turn on the T.V. The poster reads:

360 Degree Moonroof

Just one of many amenities this vehicle offers. Boasting the most sophisticated engine in the world, unparalleled biofuel technology, advanced health maintenance system, 10-21 speed options and a 360 degree moonroof, you’ll wonder why you ever drove a car.

The bad news is that Faust’s posters are a class project and not the start of a national ad campaign, at least not yet.

You can view the rest of the posters at C.I.C.L.E’s website.

Poster by Katie Faust via C.I.C.L.E.

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