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Motion to Move Forward on Rail-to-River Bikeway Project up for Vote Thursday

The tracks at Crenshaw, looking east. Sahra Sulaiman/StreetsblogLA

The ROW which would form part of the Western Segment of the proposed Rail-to-River bikeway. Photo taken at Crenshaw, looking east. Sahra Sulaiman/StreetsblogLA

In a motion before the Metro Executive Management Committee last Thursday morning, County Supervisor and Metro Board Member Mark Ridley-Thomas cited the successful “transformation of unused or abandoned rail right-of-ways into pedestrian access and bicycle routes” around the country and here in L.A. as support for his call that the Board direct Chief Executive Officer Art Leahy to move forward on the recommendations found in the 212-page feasibility study on the proposed Rail-to-River Bikeway.

Sited along an 8.3 mile section of the Harbor Subdivision Transit Corridor right-of-way (ROW), the project would connect the Crenshaw/LAX rail line to multiple bus lines (including the Silver Line), the Blue Line, the river, Huntington Park, Maywood, and/or Vernon via a bike and pedestrian path anchored along Slauson Ave.

Screenshot of proposed bikeway corridor. Phase 1 (at left) represents section that Metro could move on immediately. Phase 2 would proceed more slowly, as Metro would need to negotiate with BNSF to purchase the ROW.

The proposed bikeway corridor. Phase 1 (at left) represents the section of the corridor that Metro could move on planning for immediately. Phase 2 (at right) would proceed more slowly, as Metro would need to determine which routes were most appropriate and negotiate with BNSF to purchase a section of the ROW. (Source: Feasibility Study)

The active transportation corridor (ATC) project, first proposed by Ridley-Thomas and Supervisor and Metro Board Member Gloria Molina in 2012, has the potential to effect a significant transformation in a deeply blighted and long-neglected section of South L.A.

So, it was not surprising to see Ridley-Thomas ask that, when the full Board meets this Thursday, October 23, at 9 a.m., it approve his motion directing Leahy to identify and seek funds from Measure R, Cap and Trade, and other sources to facilitate the environmental, design, and outreach efforts recommended by the Feasibility Report.

Even though Ridley-Thomas’ strong support for the project was expected, the motion to move it forward still made me sit up a little straighter.

When I attended the two public meetings held on the corridor project, representatives from both Metro and Alta Planning + Design (consultants on the project) were firm in their suggestions that we not get our hopes up too high. There was no funding attached to the project, they said, and they were only looking at questions of feasibility. These were also the reasons, I was told, for the limited outreach and engagement of the neighbors that live along the corridor.

Not to mention that including the community might have brought other problems with it. Read more…

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Today’s Headlines

  • Active Transportation Coalition Presses For Strong Metro Complete Streets Policy (SRTS)
  • New Website Helps UCLA Students To Explore L.A. By Bus (Daily Bruin)
  • Infographic: It Takes A Lot To Extend The Gold Line (The Source)
    Foothill Gold Line Tracks Completion Celebration Tomorrow 10am Azusa (FGL Authority)
  • New Ap Helps Angelenos Hike Downtown Los Angeles (KPCCCurbed)
  • Carnage: Car vs. Winnetka Apartment Collision, 2 Injured (LAT)
  • Erin Aubry Kaplan On S.L.A. Panel Discussion, Featuring SBLA’s Sahra Sulaiman (KCET)
  • Mileage Based User Fees Workshop Presentations Online (MBUFA)
  • Why Strong Towns Is Important to Read (one of Joe’s go-to sites)
  • Ways That Bicycling Is Good For Everyone, Not Just Folks Who Bike (Guardian)

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“Pedal to the Port: A Two-Wheeled Wilmington Halloween” led by C.I.C.L.E. and Mujeres Unidas!

Metro Sponsors “Pedal to the Port: A Two-Wheeled Wilmington Halloween” led by C.I.C.L.E. and Mujeres Unidas!

Halloween has long been a walking holiday; enjoy the entire day without a car and swap four wheels for two to visit the Harbor area’s annual waterfront event!

On Saturday, October 25, through a sponsorship by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro), C.I.C.L.E. (Cyclists Inciting Change thru LIVE Exchange), along with Mujeres Unidas and other community partners, will lead a costumed bicycle ride, “Pedal to the Port: A Two-Wheeled Wilmington Halloween!”

From Banning Park, participants will ride to the Happy Harbor Halloween Festival at the Port of Los Angeles for waterfront festivities, performances, games and more. Local leaders will highlight creative street murals and other community gems along the way.

Grab a front row seat/saddle for this festive event for all ages. Capes and costumes encouraged, for both you and your bike!

As with all C.I.C.L.E. rides, this ride is family-friendly, leisurely paced and will return to the starting point after visiting the festival for one hour. C.I.C.L.E. rides are fully supported, led by trained Ride Leaders, an EMT and volunteers. Prior to the ride we will address safe street riding and group ride etiquette to ensure smooth sailing. This ride is less than 6 miles. Secure bicycle parking will be available at the festival.

When: Saturday, October 25, 2014

Time: Meet at 10 a.m., the ride will leave promptly at 10:30 a.m. The ride will return to

the starting location by 1 p.m.

Where: 401 E. M Street (at Cary Avenue), Banning Park

Wilmington, CA 90744

Accessible by:

Metro Buses: 246 & 232

What to bring: Bring water, a snack and a bicycle in good working order. This ride is FREE and open to anyone, but all participants should be able to ride a bike safely with the ability to brake, change gears, and balance while stopping and starting. All participants under 18 MUST wear a helmet and be escorted by a parent or guardian.

Children under age 8 should be on a tag-a-long, bike trailer, tandem or other safe child- carrying device to participate in the ride.

About Metro: Metro is the planner, operator and builder of LA County’s expanding public transportation system. The agency plays an important role in bicycle planning across LA County, funding more than $155.5 million for bicycle projects since 1993, facilitating first mile/last mile connections to transit and supporting bicycle transportation through various policies and programs. Metro’s sponsorship of C.I.C.L.E. events helps fulfill the agency’s goals of encouraging bicycle trips and promoting safe cycling skills.

About C.I.C.L.E.: Cyclists Inciting Change thru Live Exchange (C.I.C.L.E.) is a nonprofit organization working to promote the bicycle as a viable, healthy, and sustainable transportation choice.

About Mujeres Unidas: Mujeres Unidas is a ChicanaLatina grassroots collective based in Wilmington. We raise awareness for safe and sacred spaces, womyn’s dialogue for support and empowerment, and celebrate the victories and beautiful struggles of Womyn of Color today. Through cycling we promote a more healthy and active lifestyle.

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Construction Updates, the Naming of Stations, and More at Tonight’s Meeting on the Crenshaw Line

Screen Shot 2014-10-09 at 10.53.06 AMThe Crenshaw Leadership Council (CLC) will be holding their quarterly meeting on the progress of the Crenshaw/LAX line tonight from 6 – 8 p.m. at Dulan’s on Crenshaw (4859 Crenshaw Boulevard).

The meeting will provide updates from the work of the small groups, or PODs (Project Oriented Discussions), the CLC supports — Small Business Resources, Economic Development, Transit-Oriented Development, and Safety.

You will also have the opportunity to learn about Metro’s station naming policy and offer feedback on the station names currently under consideration. Should the stations be named after a neighborhood? A landmark structure? A historic figure? A living one (don’t laugh — Gloria Molina and Zev Yaroslavsky might just get their own stops)? Drop by the meeting to offer your thoughts and get some soul food while you’re at it.

Finally, the meeting will provide updates on construction, including the upcoming 2-week closure at Crenshaw Bl. and Rodeo Rd. Read more…

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Final Sixth Street Viaduct Model Showcased at Public Briefing; Expected Completion Date, Early 2019

Cyclists, pedestrians, and cars will all have a place on the Sixth Street Viaduct. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Cyclists, pedestrians, and cars will all have a place on the redesigned Sixth Street Viaduct, slated to open in 2019. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

“How was the meeting?” Juan asked me as I came out of the multipurpose room at the Puente Learning Center.

He was just leaving his evening English class and had missed the public briefing on the design of the Sixth Street Viaduct replacement given by Councilmember José Huizar, Architect and Principal Designer Michael Maltzan, design-build firm HNTB, the Bureau of Engineering, and Project Contractors contractors Skanska and Stacy and Witbeck.

“Have you seen it?” I asked.

“No,” he shook his head.

I grabbed his arm and pulled him into the multipurpose room.

“Wow,” he said, impressed. “This looks really nice!”

He was right — the 47-foot model was pretty amazing.

Architect Michael Maltzan describes the 47-foot model of the bridge at a packed public briefing at the Puente Learning Center. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Architect Michael Maltzan describes the design elements of the 47-foot model of the bridge at a packed public briefing at the Puente Learning Center in Boyle Heights. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Soaring forty-foot arches book-end a “ribbon of arches” that “weave [two disparate] communities together” via a massive multi-modal structure. Thirty-foot arches run the length of the rest of the 3500 ft. span of bridge, with the exception of two sixty-five-foot arches which will be accessible to pedestrians (one is visible in the top photo, at left) looking to either climb high above the structure or access the businesses and park space (to be created as part of the project) below it. Dedicated bike lanes run along either side of the traffic lanes. And the wide pedestrian walkway is both protected from traffic by a concrete barrier and unimpeded by light poles, thanks to the LED lighting that will be embedded in the arches and light both the street and the sidewalks.

Embedded LED lights illuminate the walkway and the street. (Source: Michael Maltzan Architecture)

Embedded LED lights illuminate the walkway and the street. (Rendering: Michael Maltzan Architecture)

The combination of the grandiosity of the design and the accessibility of the structure, project architect Michael Maltzan said, was intended to celebrate the notion that bridges were powerful “city amenit[ies] that should not be underestimated” (please take note, Glendale-Hyperion bridge project).

Which sounds great. Except it apparently almost didn’t happen. Read more…

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The Ultimate First Street Guide to CicLAvia: Where to Eat and Who to Meet

Lupita Barajas sits in front of her restaurant, Yeya's (across the street from Mariachi Plaza), with her grandson, Julian. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Lupita Barajas sits in front of her restaurant, Yeya’s (across the street from Mariachi Plaza), with her grandson, Julian. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

CicLAvia! Bicycles! Hipster Invaders! Gentrification!

Made you look!

Probably provoked some strong emotions, too, given the way recent headlines (see here, here, here) in asking whether activities assumed to be the purview of “hipsters” could be compatible with lower-income communities, have inadvertently re-ified the “us vs. them” framing that guides too much of the conversation on gentrification.*

Very little productive dialogue tends to come of that approach, regardless of how well-intended the question is. For one, it is incredibly effective at enticing all the angry, underwear-clad racists, classists, and all-around terrible people with Internet access out of their caves. But even among those who seek a more elevated debate, that framing almost guarantees that the highly complex issues surrounding community transformations will devolve into unpleasant wranglings over who has the right to make claims on a place based on creative interpretations of history and sweeping generalizations about “culture.”

Behold, the most tone-deaf gentri-flyer in the history of man. (Photo source unknown)

Behold, the most tone-deaf gentri-flyer in the history of man. (Photo source unknown)

That is not to say that bike lanes, bicyclists, CicLAvia, or even “hipsters” aren’t touchstones in gentrification debates. The gentri-flyer heard ’round the world (at right) made clear that they certainly are.

But, as I tried to illustrate in the stories penned on the storm the flyer generated (here, here), it’s not those things, per se, that provoke such a strong reaction. It’s the processes and power structures they represent.

In other words, people are often looking at current efforts to engage their communities in the context of the long history of discrimination, deliberate disinvestment, displacement, and exclusion from the planning processes those communities have endured and asking where they fit.

From that perspective, it becomes easier to see how residents with a lengthy list of unaddressed infrastructure and other needs might wonder exactly who lower-priority concerns like bike lanes (or an event like CicLAvia, staged in their community by non-residents) were intended to benefit. Particularly since investment often seems to not be directed at a marginalized area until after turnover is already underway and developers appear prepared to “ride the wave of increased gentrification”** by snapping up homes, apartment buildings, and retail sites.

Students from around the area speak about how memories and family define what home on the Eastside means to them at an Activarte workshop led by artist Omar Ramirez. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Students from around the area speak about how memories, family, relationships, and struggle define what home on the East Side means to them at a recent Activarte: Detouring Displacement workshop led by artist Omar Ramirez. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Of course, none of this means that people don’t want to see investments, improvements, events, or even “outsiders” in their communities. On the contrary — a number of the small business owners I’ve spoken with feel that more investment in the area and greater exposure to a wider customer base are necessary for them to survive and flourish.

They would just prefer that when that happens, investments will be directed at existing businesses and local entrepreneurs so they can grow and adapt to a changing landscape, the community will be treated as a partner in planning, development will be respectful of the character, history, and culture of the area, improvements will address the needs and aspirations of the long-time residents — especially those on the margins, and the existing residents’ ability to remain in their homes will be safeguarded so they can reap the benefits of any growth or change that results from that process.

Activarte participants discuss what "home" means to them and prepare to make signs bearing their ideas. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Activarte participants discuss what “home” means to them and prepare to make signs to communicate their ideas. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

So, some of the community’s stakeholders are hoping to help visitors and city officials to see the value of that approach by inviting participants to explore the length of 1st St. during this weekend’s CicLAvia, get acquainted with the small businesses, and learn about how culture, history, food, and family play into their vision for the future of their community.

They’re going to make it super-easy for everyone to do so, too.

Most of the businesses along 1st are family-run. Yeya's has been there four years, although owner Lupita Barajas worked in restaurants along the street for 15 years prior to starting her own business. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Most of the businesses along 1st are family-run. Yeya’s has been there four years, although owner Lupita Barajas (holding the baby) worked in restaurants along the street for 15 years prior to opening her own. Sahra Sulaiman/Streetsblog LA

Thanks to the work of Aldo Medina of the East L.A. Community Corporation, who is working to organize the businesses and offer them technical assistance, Chris Pina who nurtures the growth of small businesses via Business Source, and Juan Romero, the owner of cafe Primera Taza, 1st st. will be hosting the equivalent of one very long block party. There will be food, music, art, live painting, food, outdoor tables and chairs, awesome people, and food.

Did I mention food? Read more…

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Today’s Headlines

  • BHHS Anti-Subway Scapegoat N0. 362: Isis Terrorists (LAist)
  • Innovation Stories from 12 Cities (LAT)
  • More NELA Safety Gibberish and Double-Talk From Cedillo Staffer (Orange 20)
  • Cities Rethinking Urban Freeways, Present Company Excluded (LAT)
  • L.A. Great Streets Initiative Visits Pasadena, Talks Parking (Great Sts Tumblr)
  • A Look At Santa Monica’s Well-Being Initiative (Santa Monica Next)
  • Greenhouse Gas Emissions Are Rising Nationwide (KCET)
  • Governor Brown Vetoes One of Four Hit-and-Run Bills A.B. 2337 (Biking in L.A.)
  • Cutting Chicago Parking Requirements Encourages Transit-Oriented Development (Orlando Sentinel)

Get National Headlines at Streetsblog USA

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Oct. 9, South L.A. Advocates Discuss Civic Action and Community Voice in South L.A. on Visions and Voices Panel at USC

Flier for the October 9th Visions and Voices event at USC focusing on South L.A.

Flier for the October 9th Visions and Voices event at USC focusing on South L.A. Click to enlarge.

This coming October 9, at 6 p.m., I will be participating in a panel on Civic Action and Community Voice in South L.A. as part of USC’s Visions and Voices series.

Visions and Voices is the dynamic arts and humanities initiative established in 2006. The goal was to feature critically acclaimed artists and distinguished speakers, theatrical productions, music and dance performances, film screenings, lectures, and workshops on a variety of themes to challenge the USC community to expand their perspectives, become world-class citizens, and make a positive impact throughout the world.

Given the changes sparked by USC’s expansion of its physical footprint in South L.A. and how the desire for a secure campus has exacerbated tensions between the campus community and the longer-term residents in the process (see here, here, here), it seems like an appropriate moment for the program to take a closer look at its relationship with the community it calls home.

The organizers — Annenberg professors Alison Trope and Robeson Taj Frazier and post-doctoral scholar George Villanueva — have put together three events on South L.A. for the 2014-15 season.

The first will look at community building in and around USC and South Los Angeles, with a focus on movements and organizations that are responding to the disparities and injustices that structure life in South L.A. Speakers will include Alberto Retana, the Executive Vice President of grassroots organization extraordinaire Community Coalition (see our recent coverage of them here), Francisco Ortega, the immigration-policy advisor and South L.A. policy advisor for the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, Erin Aubry Kaplan, a journalist and columnist who writes about African American life in Los Angeles for a variety of outlets, and me, the Communities Editor for South L.A. and Boyle Heights here at Streetsblog L.A. Read more…

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Federal Employer Investment in Transportation and Job Connections Program: Improving Access to Jobs in the Los Angeles Region

The Federal Employer Investment in Transportation and Job Connections Program: Even as the LA region makes ambitious investments to provide communities and business with a more efficient, affordable, and economically competitive transportation system limited transportation options are significant barriers to connecting many workers and employers.

The resulting congestion and lack of connectivity dampen economic growth and hamper our region’s economic ability to compete in the national and global economy. But there are innovative approaches on the local, regional, and national levels that hold great promise for getting LA moving.

In this meeting you will learn about local and regional efforts to connect workers and employers and how a potential federal program could provide resources to support these efforts more effectively, promote job growth, and attract new talent and companies to the region.

In addition to local business and civic leaders, this event will feature John Robert Smith, former four- term mayor of Meridian, Mississippi, and current Chairman of T4America, who brings local government experience and insight on prospects for improvements to federal transportation policy and funding

When:

8:00 – 10:00am
September 22nd, 2014

Who:

LA Mayor Eric Garcetti – Invited

LA City Councilmember Mike Bonin – Invited

Gary Toebben, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

John Robert Smith, Transportation for America

Devon Deming, Los Angeles World Airports/Association for Commuter Transportation of Southern

California

Derrick Waters, UPS

 

 

 

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Four Mayors on Why They’re Building Out Their Cities’ Bike Networks

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Mayors Michael Nutter of Philadelphia, AC Wharton of Memphis, Bill Peduto of Pittsburgh, and Jennifer Selin of Morgantown, WV, kicked off the Pro Walk Pro Bike Pro Place conference today.

A growing number of mayors want to make big strides on bike policy, and they need smart advocates to help them do it.

Mayors Michael Nutter of Philadelphia, Bill Peduto of Pittsburgh, Jennifer Selin of Morgantown, and A.C. Wharton of Memphis addressed the opening session at the 2014 Pro Walk Pro Bike Pro Place conference, now underway in Pittsburgh. The mayors highlighted their own cities’ efforts to create safer conditions for biking and walking, and shared their thoughts about how their cities have overcome key obstacles and how advocates can make an impact.

In all four cities, mayors called investment in walking and cycling infrastructure a smart long-term policy with numerous community benefits. “It’s healthy, it’s good for the economy and our citizens,” said Philadelphia’s Nutter. They each cited constructive partnerships with advocates, and intensive listening to community concerns, as keys to advancement. Selin of Morgantown said, “I enjoy bicycling, but I can’t put it forth as my own agenda. It has to come from the community.”

Each mayor also highlighted how their bike networks will bridge social divides within their cities, and they pointed out that city mayors, unlike legislators, are obliged to make things work: “We’re the government of last resort,” said Memphis’s Wharton. “We can’t pass our responsibilities down to anyone else.”

Martha Roskowski from PeopleForBikes led off by introducing Isabella, a fictional 12-year-old girl. She urged planners and advocates in the audience to design bikeways that people like Isabella would enjoy — and highlighted how protected bike lanes have multiplied across the country. Yet in city after city, advocates alone can’t build new bike networks. “The single determinant” that best ensures success, Roskowski said, “is a really great mayor.”

Read more…