Today’s Headlines

  • Bill to Advance High Speed Rail Heads To Gov.’s Desk (LAT, SCV News)
  • Even As Valley Residents Rally Against Proposed Route (Daily News)
  • LAT Readers Stand Up For, or Pan, the Expo Line
  • Angels Star Outfielder Injured in OC Car Crash (LAT)
  • Newport PD Stepping Up Enforcement, Safety Tips for Parent as School’s Open (LAT)
  • Finding the “There” at 17th Street Expo Station in SaMo (Next)
  • A Dispatch from the Front Lines of the Granny Flat War (City Watch)
  • Everyone’s in Love with Adam Linder’s Metro Gif (Time Out)
  • In the Development War, Slow Growthers Have Already Won (Next)

More headlines at Streetsblog California

  • effron

    I’ve found the Los Angeles Times coverage of the travails of the Expo Line to be even handed. I’m going to trust that the reader mail is a representative samplng. When you have a 50% satisfaction rating that’s pretty telling. Even the ones standing up for Metro (because they couldn’t find a seat?) do so with painful disclaimers and caveats to justify doing so.

  • ExpoRider

    Nice article in the LA Times about Mike Trout’s car crash. I’m so happy to hear that the man responsible for the crash wasn’t hurt. Too bad the woman that he sent to the hospital isn’t famous, maybe the author of the article would have been more sympathetic to her.

  • Matt

    Well considering you whine about Expo on just about every forum possible, I’d say that is the opposite of representative sampling.

    Yes, Expo has had a rough start due to its popularity, but with 3 car trains now the norm many of the issues have disappeared.

  • effron

    My posting on Streetsblog affects the editorial reasoning of the Los Angeles times?

  • Matt

    The Streetsblog headline is about the reader comments on the LA Times not the editorial reasoning of the LA Times, but you already knew that from your earlier comment so don’t play dumb now. You have been complaining on multiple forums about Expo for years not just Streetsblog. Just because someone posts a comment on the LA Times or some other forum doesn’t mean it is representative or a scientific sampling. It could just be you for all we know.

  • effron

    Yes, multiple comments from multiple readers which broke down 50/50. Unlike you, it seems, I actually read the L.A. Times piece not just the Streetsblog headline before spouting off. You speak as if the Expo Line were above reproach undeserving of any criticism.

  • ExpoRider

    And you speak as if Expo is beyond contempt and undeserving of any praise. When you only express one side of the story you lack credibility.
    Yes, Phase 2 got off to a rough start, and I’ve acknowledged that in my comments, but it’s getting better. Matt is correct in stating that the 3-car trains throughout the peak periods, which have been consistently in service for the past few weeks, have made a big difference.

  • Matt

    Huh? You asked how your posting on Streetsblog affected the editorial reasoning of the LA Times? There was no editorial from the LA Times on the subject but rather letters from readers, one of whom is constantly writing letters to the LA Times on the subject. You stated there was a 50% satisfaction rating, which was very telling. No, it is not very telling just because someone with a lot of time on their hands can write letters to the editors complaining. So 2 people wrote negative letters and you make a laughable conclusion that there is low satisfaction. Okay. Maybe don’t apply for that research grant though. You speak as if the Expo Line is undeserving of any positive comments.

  • effron

    Not true. I’ve always maintained that the Expo Line would be a boon to the West Side. Then Metro bungled it’s opening. It’s apparent weaknesses in design and engineering have been exacerbated by rail car inventory problems. 3-car trains have addressed the capacity issues (for the most part) but the frequent breakdowns have continued –just check Metro’s Twitter feed to confirm that or the fortnightly apologies on The Source for that matter. Speed hasn’t picked up at all and promises to only get worse once the 2-car, 6-minute headways kick in. The bunching of trains will be the new disaster du-jour once the new year rolls around. These are fundamental problems which need to be addressed. I’m not complaining, I’m describing. There’s a difference.

  • effron

    The L.A. Times published four letters. Two expressed satisfaction with the line, two did not. Half of any number is 50%. One doesn’t need a research grant to count to four and then divide by half.

  • ExpoRider

    Thanks, Effron, good response.
    I’ve been interested by your assertion that the situation will “only get worse once the 2-car, 6-minute headways kick in”. I don’t understand your reasoning. I agree that Metro will have problems in the DTLA area due to increasing the frequency of trains on Flower and in the tunnel from one every four minutes now to one every three minutes in December. I expect more “growing pains” when that happens and that we’ll see an average of 1-2 minutes of extra delay through this section of the alignment. But for the rest of the alignment it should be all positive: seating capacity will improve 33 percent and average wait times will be cut in half. Even if there’s more bunching (which I expect will be the case) average wait times will still be much shorter. I’d gladly trade more frequent service and a higher chance of getting a seat for a couple more minutes on the train. In short, some things will get worse, others will get better, but it should be a net improvement.

  • calwatch

    That doesn’t mean anything. The editors select letters which are cogently written and represent a viewpoint which is unique. It is not supposed to be a random or representative sample.

  • effron

    If weekend bunching is any indication of how 6 minute headways perform –and it seems like as good a living experiment as any– then the bunching on the Santa Monica end could prove deeply problematic. Already there are reports of trains holding at every light between DTSM station and 17th street as well as every station as far west as Bundy. Turnover time at DTSM takes way longer than the present system can abide. Now throw into the mix the frequent train breakdowns (anywhere from 1-3 a day on Expo) plus all the goings on you describe on the eastern end of the line and you can see why I expect things are about to get worse.

  • effron

    Surely it’s one or the other.

  • ExpoRider

    Other than for the two football games I wasn’t aware that Expo was served with 6-minute headways. That will give Metro a dozen more chances to work on the operations before December.

  • calwatch

    The issue is mixing 6 minute headways on Blue and Expo. When Expo is running 6 now on game days that is not when Blue is running 6. Blue only runs 6 during peak hours, and occasionally during the Long Beach Grand Prix (and only for a few times until they found it not necessary). The traffic signals along Flower are going to have to cope with have to let 40 trains an hour pass by, which could be problematic.

    Quite frankly, for someone going from, say, a Metrolink train to a destination on the Blue Line, it might actually be faster to rent a bike share bike and ride down San Pedro to the Blue Line station. (It would have been even better if a bike share rack was added at Washington station, but that request was ignored.)

  • Buttermilk

    I’m somewhat critical of the Expo line implementation, and I think building infrastructure for 2-3 car trains was shortsighted. But I can’t help but be amused by Angelenos complaining about “crowding” on the expo line. Take a rush hour train in New York or Chicago, and then get back to us about crowding.

  • ExpoRider

    Absolutely. Increasing from 30 to 40 trains per hour crossing these intersections will be a big problem, especially at Washington Blvd where the EB Expo conflicts with the SB Blue Line.
    But that might not be as big a problem as accommodating bunching problems as they reach the 7th/Metro station. They only have room for three trains in the station, so any bunching problems back up into the tunnel. They already have issues trying to turn a train around every 4 minutes, so turning trains around every 3 minutes will be much more problematic.
    The good news is that this will only be an issue for the next 3-4 years, until the regional connector is completed, whereas the issues on Flower Street will continue to get worse in the future.