Metro Opens Gold Line Foothill Extension to Azusa

The Metro Gold Line has arrived in Azusa. Photos by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A. except where noted
The Metro Gold Line now extends east to Azusa. Photos by Joe Linton/Streetsblog L.A. except where noted

Last Saturday, Metro extended its growing rail network, celebrating the grand opening of the 11-mile Gold Line Foothill Extension. The initial phase of the Foothill Extension includes six new stations in five San Gabriel Valley cities: Arcadia, Monrovia, Duarte, Irwindale, and Azusa. Additional future phases would extend the Gold Line to Ontario Airport.

The Foothill Gold Line will extend from Pasadena to Azusa, with six new stations slated to open in September 2015. Image via Metro
The Foothill Gold Line from Pasadena to Azusa. Image via Metro

Kick-off festivities began at the Duarte/City of Hope station, where a crowd of more than a thousand gathered to hear remarks from Metro board members, numerous representatives of the cities along the route, Metro’s CEO Phil Washington, and other luminaries.

MRT xxx
County Supervisor and Metro board chair Mark Ridley Thomas hosting the Gold Line opening festivities, proclaiming “Teamwork makes the dream work.”

PW xxxx
Metro CEO Phil Washington announcing the opening of the extension that makes the Gold Line Metro’s longest rail line, in what is now nearly 100 miles of Metro rail.
GoldLineOpeningDayDuarte16Mar5
County Supervisor and Metro board member Mike Antonovich welcomes the Foothill Gold Line.
xxx AK
Elected officials cut the ribbon on the Gold Line Duarte Station platform. Photo by Aviv Kleinman

The initial train departed Duarte Station about 11:20 a.m. to celebrate at other stations along the line. Hundreds of people waited in line for the free train rides starting at noon. All afternoon, there were long lines to board trains, which were standing room only.

xxx
Hundreds of people wait to board the Gold Line in Duarte.
xxx AK
Free Gold Line train rides began at noon on Saturday. Photo by Aviv Kleinman
The view from the Gold Line train operator's seat. Photo by Aviv Kleinman
A view from the Gold Line train operator’s seat. Photo by Aviv Kleinman

Cities along the line hosted popular opening day festivities, featuring family activities, food, music, information booths, and much more.

xxx
Chinese dragons dance at the Duarte Station.
xxx
Aboard a children’s train ride, watching an early light rail train arrive at Duarte Station.

Free rides and large crowds continued celebrating the new rail line all afternoon. Below is a photo tour of the new line from west to east, Arcadia to Azusa. For more pictures from on the train, see SBLA’s earlier preview post.

IMG_0366
Gold Line crossing the new bridge over Santa Anita Avenue in Arcadia
IMG_0360 (2)
The Gold Line pulling into the Arcadia Station
IMG_0345
Monrovia’s Station Square features a pedestrian plaza, outdoor theater and train-themed park.
Gold Line Monrov
Large crowds and large parking structure at the Monrovia Station
IMG_0334
Westbound Gold Line train at the Irwindale Station
IMG_0321
Gold Line opening day festivities at the Irwindale Station
Crowds waiting to board the Gold Line in downtown Azusa
Crowds waiting to board the Gold Line in downtown Azusa

All in all, the opening drew large crowds of people excited to experience and celebrate Metro’s newest line. Hopefully many of them enjoyed the ride, and, now that they are familiar with the Gold Line, they will make transit part of their ongoing travel choices in the future.

Unfortunately, a freeway crash closed a portion of the Gold Line yesterday, but repairs were completed in time for this morning’s commute.

Streetsblog L.A. coverage of San Gabriel Valley livability is supported by Foothill Transit, offering car-free travel throughout the San Gabriel Valley with connections to the new Gold Line Stations across the Foothills and Commuter Express lines traveling into the heart of downtown Los Angeles. To plan your trip, visit foothilltransit.org. “Foothill Transit. Going Good Places.”

  • calwatch

    They should have run rail emulator buses paralleling the route to allow those who didn’t want to ride the train a way back, and for those commuters who had destinations to get to on Saturday on the rest of the line a way to get to work or appointments without fighting with those who just wanted to kick the wheels. Also, Foothill Transit, the sponsor, failed when their Line 187 service was late and overbooked with riders trying to avoid waiting for infrequent trains. At the minimum, they could have used the articulated buses to supplement service and add capacity.

  • I’m a big fan of riding the day after opening day. No crowds! I’d gladly pay the fare to avoid the wait. I feel like there’s some sort of larger point there in fact. When it comes to transportation most people will gladly trade money for time. That’s why people buy cars.

  • Ed

    Gold line extension was a big flop for me. Monday morning, 7:30am, APU/Citrus Station, tiny parking structure full. Had to drive in as usual. So much for riding the train.

    We’ll see if it’s related, but going home today on 210E was a breeze. Very light to no traffic. Hope I get at least that for my Measure R tax dollars, but I doubt it, was probably a fluke.

  • M

    I spoke to a few of my coworkers that took this Gold Line into work today and they said “Yup, it’s a train and now I can ride it from my home, but it took longer than I expected with all the walking on either end.” So not too excited, but at least they’re trying it out. I personally took the Gold Line from Union Station into Pasadena today and it didn’t seem like the train was particularly full, but the rain also messes with some people’s normal schedules & I suspect more of the travel will be in the opposite direction I was going.

  • jojopuppyfish

    Next step is building mix use next to the stations so people can walk and bicycle to it rather than everyone driving to it.

  • Jason

    Yeah, my immediate reaction to some of those pictures were “holy shit, they stuck the stations in the middle of nowhere”.

    Which, BTW, isn’t necessarily a problem, as long as good land use follows. I have a hell of a time finding the picture I’m thinking of when I think of it but I remember seeing a picture of a NYC subway station in Queens where it was built in the middle of a field. The people who built the subway were actually pretty visionary, they built those stations in the middle of fields because they took a bet that people would start moving to those areas if there was a subway station there.

  • Alex Brideau III

    If/when the APU/Citrus College station is full, you might want to consider the next station down the line, Azusa Downtown Station. I believe it has even more spaces and it’s only about a mile further down the road.

  • Ed

    Someone else mentioned Azusa Downtown parking is also full by 8am (not here, but on another site lambasting metro’s poor planning). Frankly, I’m writing the Gold Line off as a viable option for my commute at this point. I was so eagerly anticipating using it to bypass 210 traffic, but the utterly poor execution makes it useless for me and I surely won’t be voting for any future tax increases for this. Just wish I can get a refund.

  • M

    You should do what you can to support options that allow you to get to the train station without your car. Metro cannot create infinite parking and the “end” of the line often has greater parking “wants” than other stops, but building parking is super expensive, especially when it’s not being changed for. If/when the Gold Line is extended, the end will once again be someplace different as has happened on both original ends of the Gold Line and excess parking at the current end might end up being unused.

  • Walt Arrrrr

    Seems like lots of people are driving in from The 909. Both Azusa parking structures are getting filled while Irwindale, Duarte, Monrovia, and Arcadia all have spaces leftover. Even the once always full five-story parking structure at Sierra Madre Villa now has ample parking.

  • Ed

    I’d get off at Monrovia though. If I had to drive to Irwindale, I would just drive all the way. If I were someone who had to go into Downtown LA though, then yeah, that’d definitely be an option to consider. Just extremely disappointed that I got to use the gold line extension a total of zero times after months of eager anticipation.

  • Walt Arrrrr

    Metro is really putting the Active into Active Transportation with these stations. With the exception of the Downtown Azusa station, everything, including bus stops and parking requires a bit of walking. And unlike the upcoming final phase of the Expo Line, there is no adjacent bike path or even as much as bike lanes near the new stations. Whoever is the first to open a convenience store or cafe near any of these new stations will make a killing. I guess the good news is for developers who will be able to buy up adjoining industrial property on the cheap and build the mixed-use places this rail extension deserves.

  • calwatch

    I wrote a bunch of suggestions here https://medium.com/@calwatch/an-open-letter-to-metro-and-foothill-transit-regarding-gold-line-parking-27d71d007bc#.rl8s1svxn, sent it to the public email addresses of both agencies and to my Metro board members (County supervisor and city selection committee representative) and got no response – and I predicted this would happen two weeks before it opened.

  • Alex Brideau III

    Some decent ideas here. With the volume of mail they receive, I’m not surprised you didn’t receive a response, but I suspect if the parking capacity problems persist at APU/Citrus College that some of the measures you’re advocating for may indeed go into effect.

  • Alex Brideau III

    Looks like some (though not all) of your requests may have been heard:
    http://thesource.metro.net/2016/03/11/seven-tips-for-getting-to-new-metro-gold-line-extension-stations/

  • Also, Azusa is only the temporary “end”. If R2 passes, the next phase will definitely be in construction soon. But even if ti doesn’t, I can foresee C&T monies getting dragged into the mix and when it reaches Montclair, there’s a 1600 space lot there (that Metro won’t even have to build).

  • QuestionQue

    Providing parking for the less than 15% of rail riders that park a car is an enormous waste of money. It is ridiculous that parking is free so that those without cars subsidize others car ownership. When drivers pay the full cost of parking then they can complain about parking space.

  • Slexie

    Most of the new Gold Line Stations are in industrial areas without a lot of stores or shops. You want people walking or biking a mile or 2 in those barren areas late at night or early in the morning when it’s still dark? No thanks.

  • Slexie

    Yea, it’s not needed at all, considering the lot was full by 7am. The people who drive are still paying more than you are. Metro buses and subways exist because voters who never use them paid for them. Don’t act like the metro riders are being sapped, because they don’t pay for the actual bus do they? Nope.

  • Ed

    Well, I feel it’s equally ridiculous that I paid for a transportation project (with Measure R sales tax increase) that’s finally relevant for me, and I can’t use it.

  • davistrain

    As someone who has followed the local railway scene since I was a boy watching the Red Cars go by my home in Monrovia, and have watched the Gold Line grow, I can understand some of the problems that have been mentioned. The long-gone Pacific Electric route would be better for Monrovia and Duarte, but much of it has been covered by houses, so we had to go with the Santa Fe route. This does have the advantage of being a main line railway, so there’s no poky street-running in the new section. I do see development at the new stations, especially at APU-Citrus and Downtown Azusa. Monrovia has finally moved forward on restoring the vacant ex-Santa Fe depot.

    Photo: Rosedale residential development as seen from the APU-Citrus platform in Azusa.

  • QuestionQue

    Those without cars subsidize parking everywhere through parking requirements. Parking is the largest transfer of money from one class, those without cars, to another class, car owners, in the country. Every store has parking to serve the busiest day of the year which mostly sits empty. Renters pay for parking spaces that unnecessarily increase rents for those without cars. Car owners are screwing everyone else.

  • Slexie

    BS. If you want a parking space, you pay extra on top of your rent. You don’t have a car? You don’t pay the extra fee. Duh. Drivers have way more buying power and pay more taxes that fill tax funds that cover the cost of roads beyond what the gas tax doesn’t. What’s that bus going to run on if there are no roads? Drivers already pay at least a full half of road work, so it looks like you’re bus ain’t going anywhere unless drivers pay for it. I don’t feel sorry for people who don’t have a car. We all have choices.

  • QuestionQue

    Apartment buildings are required to build a fixed amount of parking for each unit and that cost is passed on in increased rents for all. Uncoupling parking from rent and removing parking requirements would reduce rents but it is not being done. The cost of parking at all stores means those without cars pay much higher percentage of income to subsidize car owners than is ever spent by owners of private cars on public transportation.

  • M

    Oh ok, I’m completely convinced. So metro should just build a 10,000 spot parking lot at every train station and give it all away for free. I see absolutely no other way that people could ever get to a train station besides driving there even with bike paths, etc.

  • M

    Yup. Just like Sierra Madre…. supposedly there’s tons of extra parking there now that it’s no longer the “end”.

  • Slexie

    10,000 spaces is a lot, I don’t think that’s going to happen. If you’re comfortable walking/biking to and from those desolate stations when it’s dark, don’t let me stop you. Most women wouldn’t feel safe and would rather drive, but that’s just me. There’s nothing wrong with driving to a metro station and parking. Those are people are doing the right thing, but it’s still not good enough for you. Go bag on the people not using public transit at all instead of disparaging the ones who do. A lot of people who vote to fund transit never use it, so there’s that.

  • M

    A sufficiently built out public transportation system should not require people living only a mile or 2 away to drive to the station. If someone cannot walk a mile safely to the transit stations, that is a failure of the infrastructure and there needs to be improvement. To me, something like a bus or having someone drop you off seems more reasonable as a short term solution while things are being built, especially if there potential/ “in progress” projects near the stations. Parking is extremely expensive (especially when you want an actual structure and not just a flat lot.) If women can only feel safe getting to a Metro light rail train station via a car there’s something wrong. To me, putting tons of parking in is not the solution unless you are willing to pay the real market price of the parking and understand that any space used for parking near the station is also space that can’t be used for more things that might be useful to have near public transportation like housing, stores and other destinations people actually want to use besides a place to leave one of their largest personal possessions.

  • Slexie

    You don’t get to tell people how to live their lives. You act like all people do is go to work and come home. People have families and errands and people to drop off and pick up in the morning and evenings. Not everyone wants to walk a mile to the station carrying work materials or in their nice work clothes. And if a person has to drop kids off at school or a spouse at work and then drive to the station and park, what business is it of yours? Get off the parking is so expensive bs. Who cares? Public transit is expensive too, and I don’t see the working poor paying for it, especially the illegal aliens. Looks like public transit is being subsidized by ME. And whatever housing you think is being missed because parking is being built, I’m fine with no more luxury towers at or near transit stations. The people who use transit ain’t living there, so it benefits the developers and people who are rich and don’t use public transit.

    Yea, great idea. Make more demands and make it more difficult for people ALREADY USING TRANSIT. Because that makes sense. I would rather see more parking at transit stations than another W or The Vermont. At least that way, the working class can drive to a station instead of walking a mile or 2. What the hell is wrong with you? You want to punish the people doing the right thing? And the people using transit for part of their commute is still not good enough for you? Step off, people have lives to live. Maybe you don’t so you don’t understand.

  • Slexie

    So you don’t understand how products are priced to include the manufacturing of them? Did you just learn that? Rents go up because of demand. If you don’t have a car, don’t pay for parking, it’s a simple concept. If you have a lease for a year, the rate is different if you have a lease for 6 months, or if you have a month to month lease. That has nothing to do with having a car. That’s the real estate market, supply and demand, a shortage or an abundance of units on the market. Give me a break with your parking spaces are ruining the world stance.

    Voters allow or deny city proposals. Most people using public transit in LA are working class immigrants and the working poor. Illegal immigrants do not vote, so they decide nothing. They also don’t pay income tax, so they pay nothing for the infrastructure that allows a subway, a light rail or the roads for then bus. Drivers pay a full half for the roads and their care, the rest comes out of other tax funds. That is not covered by illegal aliens and people with money buy more crap and pay more sales tax, income tax, property tax than the working poor. Public transit is funded by taxpayers. Poor transit riders are fully subsidized, they don’t pay for the bus, I do.

  • QuestionQue

    Renters pay for a $50,000 underground parking space under the building if they use it or not through increased rents. Local roads are paid for with property taxes which are artificially low because of Prop. 13 and in Los Angeles County with special sales taxes which everyone pays even if their income is under the counter. Transit users pay these taxes. Transit users without cars also pay the costs passed on in every transaction at a store that is required to build and maintain parking for the peak parking day of the year. Drivers should pay a fee every time they park in their subsidized parking spaces.

  • Slexie

    Ummmm…no. Almost 50% of the roads are paid for from the gas tax. The other half is paid from the general fund, sales tax, and other taxes like Measure R and stuff like that. If you’re getting paid under the counter, you’re not paying state or federal income taxes, and those go towards some local funds as well. No one feels sorry for someone just because they don’t have a car.

    But maybe you’re right. I can’t afford a monthly pass to park and a monthly pass for the metro at the same time, so I’ll just drive all the way now. And since I won’t be using transit because I can’t afford to live near any of the stations and not drive, I guess I’ll vote no on all the the transit bills, because why pay for something I’m not using, right? Why should I subsidize public transit? Why should I subsidize something I can’t afford to use? Why should I pay for someone else to get to work? No one pays my gas, or my repairs do they? I’m sick of subsidizing! Now I know how I’m voting for sure! Thanks so much!

  • Dennis_Hindman

    Half of the capital costs of the subway in the city of Los Angeles came from sales tax, which illegal immigrants probably pay.

    Poor transit riders are not fully subsidized. They pay to ride transit and if they make purchases that have sales tax then they are paying at least some of the costs of transit through that also.

  • Slexie

    Everyone pays sales tax. Not everyone is paying when transit has the honor system. You don’t know, I bet a lot of people don’t pay and they are fully subsidized. That’s so wrong. That’s why I won’t say yes to any more transit bills. Besides, I’m priced out of using it anyway.

  • Dennis_Hindman

    You can’t afford to live near the subway stations at North Hollywood, 7th st, Vermont at Santa Monica or Hollywood Blvd at Western? Nor can you afford to live near the Watts Blue Line station? Your over generalizations are quite incredible.

    The rail transit lines that are being installed in the county of Los Angeles are increasing the capacity to move people along corridors. Most of these rail lines are close to, and parallel, to freeways. Not installing the rail lines increases the load on the freeways.

  • Slexie

    The Blue Line is the sketchiest of all the lines and I’m not living in Watts. Zero desire to ride that line home and then get off and walk alone at night, no thanks. Oh rents are actually going up all along the Expo Line that hasn’t opened yet. Hey, if you can afford to live in those new developments, good for you. I live in Los Feliz about a mile and a half from the nearest station. I often have work materials to carry with me. I also work odd hours and the subway doesn’t run all night, nor do the buses or the rail. Would you like me to be more specific? Or is that too much generalizing for you? I’ll be specific: I’ve walked home many times from the station after catching the last subway home. I’ve also walked all the way home after a bus didn’t show up. Considering how much longer transit makes my commute, I guess I’ll drive.

    Not only that, but am I supposed to uproot my whole life so I can be near a transit station? I like where I live and the places I could afford are not as nice as where I live now. I have no interest in moving to NoHo, or Watts. If there were affordable places in Koreatown or further into Hollywood, maybe. But I have a nice big place to myself and parking. I always try to use transit first, but it doesn’t always work out that way.

  • m

    Ok, you convinced me again. Rip out the trains & the buses, they obvious cannot work for anyone with a family, anything but work or going home and how dare they not have a personal shuttle to drop me off wherever I’d like, all day long! There’s no buildings that ever make sense to have next to a transit station besides a giant, free parking lot so you can grab a train and be dropped off at another parking lot where you store another car that you use to do everything that cannot be done at the other stop. How is the cost of parking not important?!?!?!?! A HUGE amount of space in the city is going to parking and it serves very few people. I have no car, but a parking spot comes with my apartment and I CANNOT do anything with that parking spot but park my personal car in it. So I have to pay hundreds of dollars a month for space I literally never use and cannot use for anything else. I am not even allowed to park my bike in the spot. Every parking spot in this city (of which I believe the stat is there are 3 spots for every 1 car in the city) is VERY COSTLY. Supposedly housing is so expensive because there isn’t space. Housing is a basic need. Driving a car is not. I can’t walk to a park within 3/4 of a mile of my home, but I can reach hundreds, if not thousands of parking spots.

    I mean, I guess I must have nothing but work and home in my life and I just drink water from the tap and run around naked because I never run errands either. All of your problems only have 1 single solution and that is a car. I know no one ever takes clothes to work and keeps them there/uses dry cleaning services near their work so they can change at work.

    You’re asking what the hell is wrong with me, but we live in one of the largest cities in the U.S. I think most people are with me in thinking that people within a mile (which is NOT very far) of a train station should be able to easily and safely get there from whenever they are going WITHOUT a car. What the hell is the point of a public transportation system that is complete, but still requires a car to get anyplace on either end of the ride? Who exactly is that supposed to serve? What makes you think the poorest people both OWN and drive cars and then hop onto the train to get to work?

  • neroden

    I remember those NYC subway station pictures. I’ve seen similar pictures of Toronto subway stations surrounded by empty lots and fields.

  • neroden

    So, you didn’t know that the city LITERALLY REQUIRES developers to build parking, whether they want to or not?

    If I don’t have a car, and I’m trying to build a house, I am LEGALLY FORCED to build parking by the City of LA.

    Would you agree that this should be eliminated?

  • neroden

    Stop lying. The fact is that people are literally required to pay for parking spaces whether or not they use them. You have never actually tried to build a house or apartment in LA, have you? You also haven’t talked to anyone who has, clearly.

  • neroden

    Honestly, you don’t think things through, do you. Rents go up next to subway stations because they’re *popular*, including being popular among wealthy people. And yet you keep claiming that only poor people ride the subway?

    Huh?

  • Alex Brideau III

    “The people who use transit ain’t living there, so it benefits the developers and people who are rich and don’t use public transit.”

    That’s a pretty broad statement. Some of us actually live near transit stations for a reason: We use transit.

  • Slexie

    Wow! Lost your mind a little there, didn’t cha?

    It’s not that expensive to get a cheap car in LA. So yes, plenty of poor people drive cars and some I’m sure park them at the metro station and take the train or subway. Did you see that thousands of non-citizens were able to get their drivers licenses recently? So yes, they are driving and owning and buying cars. Catch up.

    YOU think every one should walk a mile to the station? Uh-huh. I’m a girl, and I’ve walked more than a mile home when transit let me down. Why? Because I was doing exactly what YOU think I should be doing. And guess what? I wasn’t happy walking home at 2am, ok? And for you to think that everyone should do that just shows how arrogant you are. Would you want your wife or girlfriend walking home at 2AM? Oh, it goes both ways too. I’ve waited for a bus at 3:30am to get to the west side by 7AM. Do you want your wife or girlfriend waiting for a bus on a corner in LA at 3:30am? The Red Line isn’t open that early, just so you know.

    Why did you get a place that had parking at all? There are plenty of apartments that don’t offer parking at all, or have it as an extra fee only if you have a space. Don’t get upset because you got locked into something you didn’t need. Whose fault is that? Suddenly everyone with a car is a demon because you’re paying for a spot you don’t need? Who held a gun to your head and demanded you move there? What apartment charges “hundreds of dollars a month” for a parking space? Really? If that’s true, then an apartment without parking should be “hundreds of dollars a month” less, right? I think you’re exaggerating.

    It doesn’t matter what city you live in, it’s not really safe to be walking around after midnight by yourself. But I guess that doesn’t matter to you because everyone is capable and should do what you’re doing, right? Ridiculous.

  • Slexie

    Nice cherry picking of my comments. Good for you that you can afford to live near transit. How many of your neighbors moved there and use transit every day to get to work?

  • Slexie

    Can you quote me saying ONLY poor people use the subway? I’ll wait.

  • Slexie

    Ummm…not in my building. I pay an extra $30 a month for my parking spot. I’ve lived here for a while, so the new people are paying an extra $100 a month ON TOP OF THEIR RENT. No parking space, no parking fee. Call me a liar again.

  • Alex Brideau III

    I’ll be sure to conduct a building-wide survey ASAP to find out.

  • Slexie

    No way! They HAVE to build parking too? The nerve! How dare they! Well I for one am shocked, SHOCKED! Let them build whatever they want with no requirements! Then we can have more places like the Sunset Gordon Towers and the abandoned Target in the middle of the city! Then we can have more cars parked in residential areas so the people who live there won’t have any street parking. Who needs rules? You don’t have a car, so I guess no one else needs one either in the giant sprawling LA area. Yes, let’s eliminate parking requirements so people can ditch their cars for transit and double their commute times.

    The house you’re trying to build may have someone with a car. Anyone buying it in the future might have a car. And if you don’t like the restrictions for building in LA…

  • Joe Commuter

    Lol because you don’t cherry pick AT ALL, Slexie.

  • M

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Foothill Gold Line Extension To Open March 5, 2016

|
Today, Metro CEO Phil Washington announced the opening date for the initial 12-mile extension of the Foothill Gold Line. The new Gold Line extension is set to open on March 5, 2016. The line was built by the Foothill Gold Line Construction Authority. When it was substantially complete in September, it was turned over to Metro […]

Gold Line Foothill Extension Preview Ride from Pasadena to Azusa

|
Today, Metro hosted its first press preview for journalists to ride the Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension. The 12-mile project includes 6 new stations. It will open on March 5th. Overall the ride was smooth. The train departed Pasadena’s Sierra Madre Station, stopped very briefly at the intermediate five stations, but did not open doors […]

Azusa Dedicates Two New Gold Line Stations, Service Expected 2016

|
Over a thousand people turned out in the September heat to attend last Saturday’s dedication celebration for two new Foothill Gold Line extension stations: Downtown Azusa and Azusa Pacific University/Citrus College. Though actual train service is anticipated to start in 2016, the Foothill Gold Line Construction Authority has been celebrating concluding station and rail line construction, as many […]

Irritating Double Standards In Azusa Gold Line Station Delay Request

|
Yesterday, Streetsie-nominee Steve Scauzillo broke the news at the San Gabriel Valley Tribune: the city of Azusa, Azusa Pacific University (APU), and Azusa developer Rosedale Land Partners have written to Metro to delay the opening of the APU/Citrus College Station. The APU station is the farthest east of six new Metro Gold Line rail stations set […]