Let’s Find a Freeway Project for Which to Advocate


Doesn’t That Look Like Fun!?!?

I have to admit, I’m feeling left out.

Everywhere I went today, people were talking about “710 Day.” It was all over my Inbox. My wife brought it up at lunch. The regular news reports on KFI devoted regular coverage to it throughout the day.

For those of you that missed the news, Alhambra declared July 10 to be “710 Day.” The city is planning to celebrate all of the progress being made to one day  connect the I-10 and I-210 freeways and doom the entire region to an even more rapid increase in truck traffic.

I’m not jealous because they have a truly awful project to celebrate. After all, I live on the Westside. If I were Payton Manning I could hit the Sepuveda Pass Improvement Project with a strong throw from my house if the 405 were wearing a Patriots jersey. No, I’m jealous because I want a road project for which to advocate. It looks like so much fun.

So, I reached out to the Streetsblog L.A. Editorial Board for some help, and got some great ideas. Leave your own ideas for truly, amazingly awful freeway projects we can advocate for. We’ll vote next week on election day for the best bad project idea and on July 10 we’ll have our own celebration. If you need a cheat sheet, click here.

Some of our ideas can be found after the jump.

“A 170 extension from Cahuenga Pass to Baldwin Hills.”

“i want the Reseda Freeway through the Santa Monica Mountains and the Beverly Hills freeway.” “The 170 and the 101 W do not connect to each other because it was assumed they would be constructed when the 170 turned into the Laurel Canyon/Beverly Hills freeway. The construction of the 170 certainly expedited its “desirability” as a commuter suburb into downtown LA. I would also make the case it accelerated its shift into an inner-ring suburb and all of its accompanying problems revolving around environmental justice and social equity.”

If you have a better bad idea, let us know, below.

13 thoughts on Let’s Find a Freeway Project for Which to Advocate

  1. I had a vision that Caltrans (some time in the far future) actually sent out requests for bids on “closing the gap” in the 710 and getting no response. When an official asked a contractor who would usually be first in line to send in a bid “Why didn’t you act on this project?”, the builder said “I don’t want to go to the job site Monday morning and find all my expensive equipment has been sabotaged by the South Pasadena partisans. Then I call the cops and nobody saw a thing.” Not that some of the more militant South Pasadenans would really try such “direct action”, but the thought is there.

  2. If these asshats read the feasibility reports from the 710 tunnel and the 710 expansion they would see that they are both based on boom-time traffic and port data increasing at rates that we will likely never see again. The air quality is only “improved” in these scenarios with a faulty assumption of large amounts of growth into 2035.

    These projects will be funded by bond debt to be paid with sales and property taxes in Los Angeles County – when the project’s own feasibility reports state that growth from these projects will occur in Riverside and San Bernardino counties. LA is going into debt to pay for growth in outlying counties? WTF. Seriously, WTF?!

    These clowns don’t care about any of this stuff. They saw a cartoon or saw a TV commercial when they were kids about space travel and time machines and wishing upon a star and that is all the proof they need to understand that money losing pollution creating highways were the only way to go.

    My nomination for freeway to be celebrated: 90 in Marina Del Rey.

  3. All the mountain expressways (Mt Baldy and Sierra Madre) are too hilarious. Its like they had these ideas without even looking at a topomap.

  4. I was just looking at the plans for the West Santa Ana Branch PE ROW transit system, and saw that they all intend to connect to Union Station. Since some of the 710 expansion alternatives involve a light rail line in the same area, I was wondering if anyone had investigated routes that put these two together. It might avoid extra train congestion in and out of Union Station, and would still connect to all the east-west lines.

  5. Read “Eden by Design” by Greg Hise and William Deverell and cry as you imagine most of those “freeways” as four lane separated roads with 16 foot medians, and twenty foot green-way bike paths on either side. That it is what local planners envisioned before Caltrans came in with their designs and 9:1 federal funding in 1956.

  6. I am afraid to put anything down in writing for fear Metro and Caltrans will brand it, put a cheap price tag on it, and sell it to a foreign PPP. That’s what happened with the 710 tunnel idea. No thanks.

  7. “If these asshats read the feasibility reports from the 710 tunnel and
    the 710 expansion they would see that they are both based on boom-time
    traffic and port data increasing at rates that we will likely never see
    again.”

    “These projects will be funded by bond debt to be paid with sales and
    property taxes in Los Angeles County – when the project’s own
    feasibility reports state that growth from these projects will occur in
    Riverside and San Bernardino counties.”

    These arguments are a red herring because they ignore the actual problem that a 710 Tunnel (North) would solve, namely, a means for north-south-travelers to get around LA that currently doesn’t exist. If anything, they are better suited to oppose the 710 Expansion (South) project.

    Also remember that the 710 South project only goes up to the 60 Freeway for a reason: There will be no meaningful growth in freight travel north of that point. Any growth in port transport by truck, real or imagined, will be in the Inland Empire, the home of distribution and logistic centers for the foreseeable future. The Alameda Corridor East project, which is almost fully funded, will aid in directing that growth towards the Inland Empire. What would have been ideal is for these two counties to contribute to both of these LA County projects in some fashion.

    And this is coming from a guy who supports the ship-to-rail GRID Project and NOT the 710 South widening.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Streetsblog Interview: Andres Tena

|
Back on the bike: Tena after the "Bike Not to Work Day" ride last week. Late one Thursday night, or early on Friday morning depending your point of view, this April an H3 Hummer hit a cyclist, and what followed is a controversy that fuels emotions that rivals last year’s Mandeville Canyon “Road Rage Doctor” […]

Long Beach: There’s Nothing More Toxic than Nihilism

|
A handful of folk—some environmental experts, some local health advocates, some urban designers, some regular ol’ citizens—stood in the Century Villages at Cabrillo, a small neighborhood lining the Terminal Island Freeway. They were directly across from where BNSF Rail wants to build their massive Southern California International Gateway (SCIG) rail yard and just south of […]