Today’s Headlines

  •  Gov. Signs Budget with New "Line-Item" Cuts (Times, Daily News)
  • Transit Coalition Opposes Two-Bikes Per Train-Car Proposal (YouTube h/t Soapbox)
  • Downtown Streetcar Meeting, Today (Metro Rider)
  • Boxer’s Climate Change Bill Does Little for Cities (NYT)
  • Trial for Man Who Killed Police Captain on Bike with AK-47 Goes to Trial Phase (Daily Breeze)
  • Firefighter Shoots Cyclist in Head for Biking with Toddler in SC (Tree Hugger via NYC Streetsblog)
  • Demolishing Homes for Freeways in Lagos, Now That’s Progress! (Next)
  • Sweet Before-and-After Pics of Shared Space Streets in Ashford, UK (How We Drive)
  • Get Ready for the Brentwood Grand Prix (News Blaze)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Regarding Streetcars,

    Jarrett Walker posted a blog that got wide attention called “Streetcars: An Inconvenient Truth”

    http://www.humantransit.org/2009/07/streetcars-an-inconvenient-truth.html

    —————-

    http://www.humantransit.org/2009/07/what-i-meant-by-mobility-could-also-be-called-access.html

    Throwing Jarrett Walker’s blog in there today. He discusses the difference between “mobility” and “access”.

    http://www.vtpi.org/measure.pdf

    He references this interesting paper entitled “Traffic, Mobility and Accessability” by Todd Littman from the Victoria Transportation Policy Institute.

    —–
    Two paragraphs stand out for me:

    – “As usual with transport planning concepts, Todd Litman has a friendly, readable paper carefully defining the mobility/access distinction. Mobility is how far you can go in a given time. Access is how many useful or valuable things you can do. If a new store opens up near your house, selling a particular product that you like, that doesn’t improve your mobility but it does improve your access. You can now get your product closer to home, so you don’t need as much mobility as you did before. Access is also improved by working at home, downloading music instead of going to a CD store, and moving in with your romantic partner. In other words, a lot of the work of access is simply about eliminating the need for transportation. Bravo.”

    – “So my point remains: If you replace a bus with a streetcar, and make no unrelated changes, the map above doesn’t change at all. Your mobility (the area you can reach in a fixed time) doesn’t improve, but your access (the experiences, connections, transactions you can get to) doesn’t improve either, UNLESS — Unless the streetcar triggers redevelopment, so that solely because of the streetcar, new stuff gets built closer to you. That is the only sense in which a streetcar project improves access.”

    —————–

    I still enthusiastically support the Streetcar Project on Broadway, but Jarret Walker’s blog is a great new find for me. Intelligent questions are asked and the comments are generally troll free and well-informed.

    I also like http://thetransportpolitic.com/ by Yonah Freemark. It’s a little more wonky. The High Speed Rail discussion is interesting too.

  • Regarding Streetcars,

    Jarrett Walker posted a blog that got wide attention called “Streetcars: An Inconvenient Truth”

    http://www.humantransit.org/2009/07/streetcars-an-inconvenient-truth.html

    —————-

    As a follow-up, I’m throwing in Jarrett Walker’s follow-up on this. He discusses the difference between “mobility” and “access”.

    http://www.humantransit.org/2009/07/what-i-meant-by-mobility-could-also-be-called-access.html

    He references this interesting paper entitled “Traffic, Mobility and Accessability” by Todd Littman from the Victoria Transportation Policy Institute.

    —–
    Two paragraphs stand out for me:

    – “As usual with transport planning concepts, Todd Litman has a friendly, readable paper carefully defining the mobility/access distinction. Mobility is how far you can go in a given time. Access is how many useful or valuable things you can do. If a new store opens up near your house, selling a particular product that you like, that doesn’t improve your mobility but it does improve your access. You can now get your product closer to home, so you don’t need as much mobility as you did before. Access is also improved by working at home, downloading music instead of going to a CD store, and moving in with your romantic partner. In other words, a lot of the work of access is simply about eliminating the need for transportation. Bravo.”

    – “So my point remains: If you replace a bus with a streetcar, and make no unrelated changes, the map above doesn’t change at all. Your mobility (the area you can reach in a fixed time) doesn’t improve, but your access (the experiences, connections, transactions you can get to) doesn’t improve either, UNLESS — Unless the streetcar triggers redevelopment, so that solely because of the streetcar, new stuff gets built closer to you. That is the only sense in which a streetcar project improves access.”

    —————–

    I still enthusiastically support the Streetcar Project on Broadway, but Jarret Walker’s blog is a great new find for me. Intelligent questions are asked and the comments are generally troll free and well-informed.

    ————–

    thetransportpolitic.com/

    I also like by Yonah Freemark. It’s a little more wonky. The High Speed Rail discussion is interesting too.