The Permanent Effect of Temporary Street Closures

So, we all love a good street party, yes? But at some point, the party is over… right?

Or is it?

That’s what Joan Pasiuk over at the Streetsblog Network member blog Transit for Livable Communities,
in the Twin Cities of Minnesota, is asking. Noting the popularity of
festive street-closure events in cities around the globe (Bogotá’s Ciclovía
being the premier example), Pasiuk wonders what the permanent effect
is, and whether it would be worthwhile to start something similar in
her community:

2757131617_cd68d44aa4_m.jpgPhoto of Bogotá’s Ciclovía by Velaia via Flickr.

Communities
near and far (Chicago, Miami, New York City, Bogotá, Quito, Baltimore,
Portland, Guadalajara, El Paso…) are excited about opening streets to
people on selected weekend days. Travel on foot, scooter, skates,
stroller, wheelchair, or bicycle (but not motor vehicle) along selected
routes sets the stage for a community celebration of city life. Mayors
have often been the voice of inspiration after learning of positive
experiences in other cities, telling staff to make it so…

I am interested in the idea for building community, but dubious about
whether we need a new event here. We heard no evaluation of results
except turnout. Is there a lasting behavior or attitude change —
something beyond a party on a temporarily transformed street? I live
not far from Grand Avenue, which once a year abandons its car-centric
attitude and throws itself open to the masses. And masses come — maybe
drawn by the mini donuts, free music and great people watching as much
as the open stretch of asphalt. It would be possible to create new
messaging — encouraging fewer people to drive to the walking event for
example, and new activities — substituting a jazzercise demo for a
beer tent. But even so, would they leave with a sense of the vitality
of urban streets? Would they recreate the family experience by walking
more together? I remain skeptical about the health and transportation
benefits, but love a street party as much as anyone.

It’s
an interesting question to ask in light of the recent opening of Times
Square to pedestrians. Did New York’s earlier, temporary street-closure
events — like last year’s Summer Streets — build popular awareness and support for the Times Square move?

Elsewhere around the network, people seem to be blogging furiously after a Memorial Day lull. Some highlights: 1000 Friends of Connecticut on the American Academy of Pediatrics statement that current development patterns are unhealthy for children; Greater City: Providence on the tension between property rights and progressive planning; and The Infrastructurist on the effort to save Detroit’s magnificent — and decrepit — Michigan Central train station.

  • JustAJoe

    LOL – go to any of the poorer neighborhoods, especially the Hispanic ones and you will see a “Street Fair” atmosphere on sidewalks every weekend so crowded you can hardly walk, street vendors, and people of the neighborhood out walking together.

    Possibly the members of these communities could be tapped for urban planning commissions to spread this phenomenon, with government funding, of course.

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